Posts Tagged ‘motorbike’

Typically, I attend the “Big” International Motorcycle Show series that feature all the major manufactures which, normally, occurs in winter in my region of the world.  This year I will attend not only that show, but also the IMS Outdoor event as well. One reason is how starved I am for in person motorcycle events but also because a friend of this blog is going to be a presenter.

Progressive IMS Outdoors motorcycle shows are offering presentations on “RVing with motorcycles, sidecars, and trikes”.  Lucinda Belden is the new presenter, and her sidecar will be on center stage for a half hour show two times per day at each event.  From August – October she will be covering six event locations nationally talking about how RV and motorcycles work together.

Lucinda is the proprietor of “Direction Wide Open” or DWO. DWO is Lucinda’s, and her husband Will, place to share their RV and Motorcycle adventures with family, friends, and future friends.  They are two full-time RVers and avid motorcyclists, sidecarists (is that really a word?).

Lucinda is the proprietor of “Direction Wide Open” or DWO. DWO is Lucinda’s, and her husband Will, place to share their RV and Motorcycle adventures with family, friends, and future friends.  They are two full-time RVers and avid motorcyclists, sidecarists (is that really a word?).

I can’t congratulate Lucinda enough; it is always tough to get a break into any industry but through her and Will’s hard work she is going to be telling a story many of us will want to hear.

Please go to the International Motorcycle Show Outdoors website and if an event is near you check it out.

ijustwant2ride.com

Hey guys, I am in a middle of a move and have not provided as much content lately.  Please stand by for a bit while I get back to normal… whatever that is!

Up Shift Entire Family to Race at the Amateur Championship – The entire Rau family is going to the AMA Amateur National Motocross Championship at Loretta Lynn’s motorcycle complex! This is the first time that a mom, dad, and son have pulled this type of hat trick.

Mom and dad (Tressa & Justin) qualified for the Senior (40+) and son (Jett) made the cut in the Mini-E Junior (4-6) class.

My Take – This is one of those, “Isn’t that cool!” items.  Congratulations to the Rau family and I hope they all make the podium for another amateur motocross racing first!   

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Up ShiftNew Harley Davidson Sportster – If you did not see this coming, I don’t know what to say to you.  The ever changing and tightening emission standards is slowing ending the air-cooled era of motorcycling. Lament if you wish, but the old engine just could not compete in this modern world.

The 50+ year old Sportster name continues at Harley Davidson with an all-new motorcycle. The new Sportster brings the Harley Revolution Max engine and 121 horses (from 1252cc) as a major upgrade to the name.   

To help tame that horsepower the new Sportster has lean-sensitve Antilock brakes, wheelie control, traction control and “Drag Torque Slip Control” to reduce rear wheel lockup during engine braking.

My Take – At first glance this new Sportster looks a like the FXDR from a few years ago.  A lot of styling points from that bike made it to the Sportster.  I do like the styling; I do like the performance upgrade, and I understand why Harley Davidson had to make the change to old bloodline.  I have not yet had an opportunity to ride this motorcycle, but I will make the time to do so.  At a $15,000 US starting point it seems to align with many of its competitors.

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Ride on, Ride Safe

Click here to see the last news update.

Each year I post my top 10 weird motorcycle list, you can see last years winners here.  As crazy as some of the “modern” motorcycles are, our forefathers built some crazy stuff too!

Check out the following “vintage” or “old school” wild and weird motorcycles. If you have more or better please pass them along in the comment section.

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

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Manufacturer LeMans Corporation

Components WHEELS

Summary LeMans Corporation is recalling certain Drag Specialties replacement laced motorcycle rear wheels, with part number 0204-0369 and size 16″ x 3.00″. The holes for the spokes in the hub are misaligned, which could result in broken spokes.

Remedy Dealers will replace the rear wheel, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed July 6, 2021. Owners may contact LeMans Corporation customer service at 1-608-758-1111.

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Manufacturer Honda (American Honda Motor Co.)

Components EXTERIOR LIGHTING

Summary Honda (American Honda Motor Co.) is recalling certain 2020-2021 Super Cub C125, CB500X, CB650R, CBR300R, CBR500R, CBR650R, Rebel 300, Rebel 500, Monkey, 2020 CRF250L, GROM, 2021 CRF300L, and CB500F motorcycles. The rear reflector lens may not reflect brightly enough. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) number 108, “Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Associated Equipment.”

Remedy Dealers will replace the rear reflector, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed July 23, 2021. Owners may contact Honda customer service at 1-866-784-1870. Honda’s number for this recall is KM3.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

Check out the May Recall List Here

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Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

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Manufacturer Ducati North America

Components EXTERIOR LIGHTING

Summary Ducati North America (Ducati) is recalling certain 2021 Scrambler 800 Night Shift motorcycles. The front and rear turn signal lights may not flash brightly enough. As such, these motorcycles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) number 108, “Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Associated Equipment.”

Remedy Dealers will replace the front and rear turn signals, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed June 23, 2021. Owners may contact Ducati customer service at 1-888-391-5446. Ducati’s number for this recall is SRV-RCL-21-009.

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Manufacturer Ducati North America

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary Ducati North America (Ducati) is recalling certain 2015-2021 Monster 821, 2014-2021 Monster 1200 S/STD, and 2016-2019 Monster 1200 R motorcycles. The rear brake hoses may be susceptible to heat damage.

Remedy Dealers will replace the rear brake hoses, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed June 23, 2021. Owners may contact Ducati customer service at 1-888-391-5446.

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Manufacturer Ducati North America

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary Ducati North America (Ducati) is recalling certain 2017-2020 Monster 797, Monster 1200, Supersport, 2016-2020 XDiavel, and 2018-2020 Monster 821 motorcycles. Air may permeate the rear bake system.

Remedy Dealers will install new rear brake hoses, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed June 17, 2021. Owners may contact Ducati customer service at 1-888-391-5446.

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Manufacturer Arcimoto Inc

Components SEAT BELTS

Summary Arcimoto Inc (Arcimoto) is recalling certain 2019-2021 FUV, 2020 Deliverator, 2021 Rapid Responder motorcycles. The seat belt retractor spool sleeve may be cracked, allowing broken pieces to block the seat belt from retracting.

Remedy A service technician will replace the seat belt retractor, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed May 31, 2021. Owners may contact Arcimoto customer service at 1-541-683-6293.

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Manufacturers Arcimoto Inc

Components ELECTRICAL SYSTEM, HYBRID PROPULSION SYSTEM

Summary Arcimoto Inc (Arcimoto) is recalling certain 2019-2021 FUV, 2021 Rapid Responder, 2020 Deliverator, 2020-2021 Roadster. Due to a software error, communication between inverters may time out, possibly resulting in an unexpected battery shutdown.

Remedy A service technician to reprogram the inverter firmware, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed May 12, 2021. Owners may contact Arcimoto customer service at 1-541-683-6293. Note: Vehicles previously repaired under Recall 19V834 will need to return for the new remedy.

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Manufacturer Arcimoto Inc

Components ELECTRICAL SYSTEM, STEERING

Summary Arcimoto Inc (Arcimoto) is recalling certain 2019-2021 FUV, 2020 Deliverator, 2020-2021 Roadster, and 2021 Rapid Responder motorcycles. The Steering Angle Sensor (SAS) may have been incorrectly calibrated, causing the SAS to fail to or incorrectly detect a fault.

Remedy A service technician will update the firmware and replace the idler arm, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed May 20, 2021. Owners may contact Arcimoto customer service at 1-541-683-6293.

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Manufacturer KTM North America, Inc.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary KTM North America, Inc. (KTM) is recalling certain 2019-2020 KTM 790 Adventure and 790 Adventure R, and 2020 KTM 790 Adventure R Rally motorcycles. The front brake master cylinder piston return spring may be too weak to return the brake piston to its original position, reducing the functionality of the front brake.

Remedy Dealers will replace the return spring, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed May 21, 2021. Owners may contact KTM customer service at 1-888-985-6090. KTM’s number for this recall is KTM2106.

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Manufacturer Suzuki Motor USA, LLC

Components ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

Summary Suzuki Motor USA, LLC (Suzuki) is recalling certain 2019-2020 UH200 motorcycles. The speedometer assembly resistors may corrode and cause a loss of power to the wheel speed sensor, preventing the speedometer and odometer from displaying information.

Remedy Dealers will replace the speedometer assembly, free of charge. Owner notification letters were mailed May 24, 2021. Owners may contact Suzuki customer service at 714-572-1490 or http://www.suzukicycles.com.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

Click here to see the April 2021 Motorcycle Recalls

Let us start by assuming you have the motorcycle skills necessary to ride with a passenger.  If you are scaring yourself when you ride, you don’t need a pillion (another term for passenger) to scare as well. You want your passenger, especially if they are your significant other, to want to ride more … not be put off motorcycles forever

That said, I do have some personal rules for my pillion. There’s a big difference between giving someone a ride around the block and your long term motorcycle passenger, but all should be considered when loading up the bike with someone other than yourself.

The motorcycle passenger wears all the gear, all the time

Even in an area without helmet laws you should consider this, especially for someone who has not ridden before. Give them that sense of protection beyond your riding skills.

Hold on to me – not my clothes

I’m sure we’ve all known a person who just wants to just rip the clothes off our body … but doing so while riding a motorcycle is not the right time. Tell your pillion to hold on to you, or the grab rails if the bike has them.

Try hard not to ping

Pinging is when your passenger hits the back of your helmet when the motorcycle slows down. I talk about this with my pillion before their first ride, and the payoff has been dramatic.

Getting on or off the motorcycle

Tell your passenger NOT to mount or dismount the motorcycle unless:

  • you have both feet firmly on the ground
  • both hands on the handle bars, AND
  • you let them know they can now move about the cabin freely.

Sit still at slow speeds

Tell your pillion to really try not to move around during slow speeds. In particular, they should sit still when stopping at, or leaving from, a traffic light. Balance is very important at slow speeds on a motorcycle.

If your pillion needs to talk…

They should tap your shoulder on the side they wish to talk. You can get back to them as soon as you can … please leave a message at the beep.

And if they want to show you something, have them tap on the side they want you to look, and then point.

If your pillion gets scared

Of course, you’re NEVER going to scare your pillion (are you?) … BUT an alarmed pillion should close their eyes, hold on and try not to move. When the event is over they can tap the rider, and ask him to pull over.

And when fully stopped and dismounted, the pillion should proceed to smack the rider (just joking).

Practice power/emergency stops

This is aimed more for your permanent motorcycle passenger then the “once around the block” pillion.  Make sure both you and your pillion know what it feels like to brake hard – very hard – before you really need to.

Practice low speed maneuvers

Similar to the emergency stop, it pays to know how the bike is going to handle with both you and your passenger at slow speeds.

And if you’re going to be packing the bags for a long trip you might want to practice “fully” loaded as well. Some low-speed figure 8s in an empty parking lot will show you a lot about how the fully loaded bike is going to respond out on the road.

Set up the bike for a pillion

While every motorcycle is different, they all need to be adjusted for the additional weight of a pillion.

Check your suspension pre-loads to make sure they’re going to handle properly. Not much is worse than bottoming out over and over again … plus it’s hell on your tires

The motorcycle passenger should be invested in safety

Get your pillion involved in the safety aspects of riding with you. For example, it could be your pillion’s job to check tire pressure before the ride and be part of the Search, Evaluate, Execute (SEE) strategy that you learned as part of the Motorcycle Safety Foundation training.

Talk it over, and decide who’s responsible for what action.

Consider doing a rider’s course two-up

I have not done this myself, but I do think it is a good idea.  I bet I’ll be surprised by what I learn when I get around to it.

That might seem like a lot of rules for riding with a pillion.

But I bet that most of us do at least half of the things on this list without even thinking about it. That just leaves the other half of the list to deal with!

If you have some rules for riding with a pillion, feel free to post them in the comments below!

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness month. It is important to get the word out to your non-riding friends and family! The next set will be about protecting ourselves.

I don’t own any of these photos about motorcycle safety but I have gathered them from across the internet. I think “Fair Use” is in full operation in regards to their use.


So copy and paste these motorcycle safety pictures &, memes. Post them up to all your favorite sites. Point them out to non-riders, we already get it!


Ride On, Ride Safe.

safety

May is motorcycle safety awareness month…here is an idea to help spread awareness to the children.

As we all know all the safety gear we wear and all the safety tech on our motorcycles are just not enough at times. Awareness of motorcycles by drivers of cars and trucks is as important as everything we do.

So to help improve the awareness in others (and therefore ourselves) we need to start teaching children to watch for motorcycles. That is why the idea of teaching kids to count motorcycles instead of “punch bugs” is so important. If they are watching for motorcycles as kids they will have an easier time seeing them when they start to drive. Thus our safety as motorcyclist is improved. The payoff is in the future but let’s invest now.

Make a game that has a small reward when they spot “X” number of motorcycles. Ask your non-riding friends to do this with their children. Mention it at events and gatherings, just get the word out. You know when a 6 year old yells “motorcycle” that their parent is going to see it to!!

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

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Manufacturer Honda (American Honda Motor Co.)

Components STRUCTURE

Summary: Honda (American Honda Motor Co.) is recalling certain 2021 CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP motorcycles. The rear cushion connecting plate(s) may have been installed incorrectly, which may cause the plate(s) to break.

Remedy: Honda will notify owners, and dealers will inspect and, as necessary, replace both rear cushion connecting plates free of charge. The recall is expected to begin June 7, 2021. Owners may contact Honda Powersports customer service at 1-866-784-1870. Honda’s number for this recall is KL9.

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Manufacturer Harley-Davidson Motor Company

Components EXTERIOR LIGHTING

Summary: Harley-Davidson Motor Company (Harley-Davidson) is recalling certain 2019-2021 Sportster (XL) motorcycles and 796 headlight assemblies that may have been sold as replacement parts for 2005-2019 Sportster, 2005-2017 Softail, 2005-2017 Dyna, and 2005-2011 V-Rod motorcycles. The glass bulb within the headlight assembly may fail, causing a loss of both high and low beams.

Remedy: Harley-Davidson will notify owners, and dealers will install a headlamp bulb shield, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 12, 2021. Owners may contact Harley-Davidson customer service at 1-800-258-2464. Harley-Davidson’s number for this recall is 0177.

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Manufacturer Ducati North America

Components ENGINE

Summary: Ducati North America (Ducati) is recalling certain 2021 Multistrada V4 S motorcycles. Excessive wear of the valve guides may cause the valve head to break.

Remedy: Ducati will notify owners, and the dealer will replace the entire motorcycle engine with another engine, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 15, 2021. Owners may contact Ducati customer service at 1-888-391-5446. Ducati’s number for this recall is SRV-RCL-21-002.

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Manufacturer Arcimoto Inc

Components ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

Summary: Arcimoto Inc (Arcimoto) is recalling certain 2019-2020 FUV, and 2020 Deliverator vehicles. The electronic drivers in some of the high voltage (HV) contactors may malfunction and overheat, which could cause the battery to shutdown.

Remedy: Arcimoto will notify owners, and an Arcimoto factory technician will replace the contactors and related components, free of charge. The recall began March 29, 2021. Owners may contact Arcimoto customer service at 1-541-683-6293.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

Click here for the March Motorcycle Recall List

Your motorcycle helmet is your most important piece of equipment so keeping it clean is important.  Not just from an appearance perspective but as a method to ensure it is still in good working condition. Also, April is Motorcycle Helmet Awareness month so now is a good time to do the work!

While you are cleaning your helmet look for cracks in the shell, that the hard foam is intact and in good condition (this is the part that does most of the work to protect your head) and all the other parts are in good order.  

Before you start… read your owner’s manual on cleaning your specific motorcycle helmet.

1 – Take either a microfiber or paper towels, soaked in warm water and lay across the helmet and visor.  This will moisten any hard dried bugs or grime that might scratch the finish if you first went to scrubbing or rubbing.  Leave the towels on for about 10 minutes and then gently remove the now softer bugs/grime. Remove the visor before step 2.

2 – After the bugs/grime are soft use warm soapy water to clean the shell fully. Rinse, dry and admire your clean exterior.

3 – The visor needs additional attention. The warm towels may have helped get rid of the road grime, but your visor needs special attention. DO NOT use any products that have acid or ammonia! Even products with citric acid can damage the visor (personal experience). Most glass cleaners have some form of acid or ammonia so avoid them as well. Warm soapy water and microfiber cloth is the best way to safely clean your visor.

4 – Make sure you clean out the visor mechanism. Keeping the mechanism clean will help make sure it works as designed.

5 – Clean the sun visor in the same manner you cleaned the visor. No ammonia or acid-based cleaners!

6 – Now that the outside of your helmet is clean how about the inside? MOST helmets allow you to remove the interior padding. Look at your instructions and pull the lining out. Some motorcycle helmet manufactures allow you to put the padding in a washing machine, others recommend hand cleaning in warm soapy water. If you use the by hand method, I recommend a baby shampoo.

7 – If your helmet’s padding is not removable follow the instructions your helmet manufacture provided.  BUT, in my opinion only, dunking the entire helmet into soapy water is not the way to go. It takes forever to dry; it can mildew, and I am always unsure if it may have damaged the underlying foam. My suggestion is to use a motorcycle helmet sanitizing spray.

8 –Check the vents to make sure they are clean and open.  A shot of compressed air, from the inside, might dislodge dried road grimes and bugs.

9 – Put it back together, following the instructions if you still have them. 😊

Ride On, Ride Safe