Posts Tagged ‘Motorcycle’

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness month. It is important to get the word out to your non-riding friends and family! The next set will be about protecting ourselves.

I don’t own any of these photos about motorcycle safety but I have gathered them from across the internet. I think “Fair Use” is in full operation in regards to their use.


So copy and paste these motorcycle safety pictures &, memes. Post them up to all your favorite sites. Point them out to non-riders, we already get it!


Ride On, Ride Safe.

safety

May is motorcycle safety awareness month…here is an idea to help spread awareness to the children.

As we all know all the safety gear we wear and all the safety tech on our motorcycles are just not enough at times. Awareness of motorcycles by drivers of cars and trucks is as important as everything we do.

So to help improve the awareness in others (and therefore ourselves) we need to start teaching children to watch for motorcycles. That is why the idea of teaching kids to count motorcycles instead of “punch bugs” is so important. If they are watching for motorcycles as kids they will have an easier time seeing them when they start to drive. Thus our safety as motorcyclist is improved. The payoff is in the future but let’s invest now.

Make a game that has a small reward when they spot “X” number of motorcycles. Ask your non-riding friends to do this with their children. Mention it at events and gatherings, just get the word out. You know when a 6 year old yells “motorcycle” that their parent is going to see it to!!

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

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Manufacturer Honda (American Honda Motor Co.)

Components STRUCTURE

Summary: Honda (American Honda Motor Co.) is recalling certain 2021 CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP motorcycles. The rear cushion connecting plate(s) may have been installed incorrectly, which may cause the plate(s) to break.

Remedy: Honda will notify owners, and dealers will inspect and, as necessary, replace both rear cushion connecting plates free of charge. The recall is expected to begin June 7, 2021. Owners may contact Honda Powersports customer service at 1-866-784-1870. Honda’s number for this recall is KL9.

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Manufacturer Harley-Davidson Motor Company

Components EXTERIOR LIGHTING

Summary: Harley-Davidson Motor Company (Harley-Davidson) is recalling certain 2019-2021 Sportster (XL) motorcycles and 796 headlight assemblies that may have been sold as replacement parts for 2005-2019 Sportster, 2005-2017 Softail, 2005-2017 Dyna, and 2005-2011 V-Rod motorcycles. The glass bulb within the headlight assembly may fail, causing a loss of both high and low beams.

Remedy: Harley-Davidson will notify owners, and dealers will install a headlamp bulb shield, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 12, 2021. Owners may contact Harley-Davidson customer service at 1-800-258-2464. Harley-Davidson’s number for this recall is 0177.

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Manufacturer Ducati North America

Components ENGINE

Summary: Ducati North America (Ducati) is recalling certain 2021 Multistrada V4 S motorcycles. Excessive wear of the valve guides may cause the valve head to break.

Remedy: Ducati will notify owners, and the dealer will replace the entire motorcycle engine with another engine, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 15, 2021. Owners may contact Ducati customer service at 1-888-391-5446. Ducati’s number for this recall is SRV-RCL-21-002.

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Manufacturer Arcimoto Inc

Components ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

Summary: Arcimoto Inc (Arcimoto) is recalling certain 2019-2020 FUV, and 2020 Deliverator vehicles. The electronic drivers in some of the high voltage (HV) contactors may malfunction and overheat, which could cause the battery to shutdown.

Remedy: Arcimoto will notify owners, and an Arcimoto factory technician will replace the contactors and related components, free of charge. The recall began March 29, 2021. Owners may contact Arcimoto customer service at 1-541-683-6293.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

Your motorcycle helmet is your most important piece of equipment so keeping it clean is important.  Not just from an appearance perspective but as a method to ensure it is still in good working condition. Also, April is Motorcycle Helmet Awareness month so now is a good time to do the work!

While you are cleaning your helmet look for cracks in the shell, that the hard foam is intact and in good condition (this is the part that does most of the work to protect your head) and all the other parts are in good order.  

Before you start… read your owner’s manual on cleaning your specific motorcycle helmet.

1 – Take either a microfiber or paper towels, soaked in warm water and lay across the helmet and visor.  This will moisten any hard dried bugs or grime that might scratch the finish if you first went to scrubbing or rubbing.  Leave the towels on for about 10 minutes and then gently remove the now softer bugs/grime. Remove the visor before step 2.

2 – After the bugs/grime are soft use warm soapy water to clean the shell fully. Rinse, dry and admire your clean exterior.

3 – The visor needs additional attention. The warm towels may have helped get rid of the road grime, but your visor needs special attention. DO NOT use any products that have acid or ammonia! Even products with citric acid can damage the visor (personal experience). Most glass cleaners have some form of acid or ammonia so avoid them as well. Warm soapy water and microfiber cloth is the best way to safely clean your visor.

4 – Make sure you clean out the visor mechanism. Keeping the mechanism clean will help make sure it works as designed.

5 – Clean the sun visor in the same manner you cleaned the visor. No ammonia or acid-based cleaners!

6 – Now that the outside of your helmet is clean how about the inside? MOST helmets allow you to remove the interior padding. Look at your instructions and pull the lining out. Some motorcycle helmet manufactures allow you to put the padding in a washing machine, others recommend hand cleaning in warm soapy water. If you use the by hand method, I recommend a baby shampoo.

7 – If your helmet’s padding is not removable follow the instructions your helmet manufacture provided.  BUT, in my opinion only, dunking the entire helmet into soapy water is not the way to go. It takes forever to dry; it can mildew, and I am always unsure if it may have damaged the underlying foam. My suggestion is to use a motorcycle helmet sanitizing spray.

8 –Check the vents to make sure they are clean and open.  A shot of compressed air, from the inside, might dislodge dried road grimes and bugs.

9 – Put it back together, following the instructions if you still have them. 😊

Ride On, Ride Safe

Up ShiftDistinguished Gentleman’s Ride – This year plan on your Dapper Riding to take place on May 23rd.  The format of the ride will be based on the COVID rules where you live and ride.  Some will ride solo, other on specific routes and some may even get to ride as a group.

The event has raised over $27 Million dollars for men’s health causes over the years and the organizers hope to pop the $30 million mark this year.  To help that along Triumph Motorcycles will be provide four motorcycles to give to the top fund raisers worldwide. Check out gentlemansride.com for more details.

My Take – I have participated in a couple DGR rides and raised a small bit of money for the cause.  It is fun to dress up and go for a ride, especially for a good cause! 

Check out this video of me leaving for the 2014 DGR.

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Up ShiftInternational Female Ride Day – This year plan to set aside May 1st to get your International Female Ride Day on.  This year it is going to be a fix of solo rides, socially distanced gatherings, and meetups in 120 countries and every continent except Antarctica.

 According to IFRD’s press release, “The movement places a spotlight on the diverse participation of women already engaging in motorcycling and powersports while inspiring other women to learn to ride and obtain their license.” It goes on to state that, even though female ridership has doubled over the last decade, women still represent just around 20 percent of all motorcycle owners, and the momentum needs to continue to advance the future of motorcycling for women and, arguably, the sport.”

The 15th version of the IFRD is using the theme (and hashtag) of #FocusFemaleForward to put more emphasis on the IFRD’s goals of encouraging new women to ride while aiming to move women forward in all aspects of motorcycling.

My Take – The 15th year anniversary!  Yet another reason to get out and ride… not that we really need one! 

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Down ShiftFlying motorcycle by Subaru.  OK I thought this was an April’s Fools joke but maybe it is not.  Multiple sources are reporting, including Motorcycle.com, that Subaru has filed for a patent on a flying motorcycle.

From what I can tell the wings and engines of the flying motorcycle would fold up similar to those on a airplane on an aircraft carrier. When flying the wings would fold out, the motorcycle wheels would retract and way you are off into the wild blue yonder.

My Take – Hooey

As April is “Motorcycle Helmet Awareness Month” I thought I would pull this post from 2018 back to the top. Sarah’s words still are valid.

Whether you’re just replacing one helmet due to age or degradation, or if you’ve found a stack of old helmets in your Dad’s garage, figuring out what to do with them after they’ve outlived their usefulness can be tricky. Motorcycle helmets can’t be resold or given away for future use as their safety can’t be guaranteed. So what can you do? Here are a few possibilities for dealing with old helmets.

Donate to Emergency Services

Perhaps the best way to dispose of an old motorcycle helmet is to find an emergency services department that might be interested in using intact helmets for training. They can use them to teach first responders how to safely remove a helmet from an accident victim who may be injured. Removing a helmet from a patient who might have a head, neck, or back injury can be difficult, as helmets are heavy and unwieldy. Emergency personnel responding to an accident need to learn to remove helmets without risking further injury to patients. However, there may be more helmets available than they need, and if you can’t find a department in need, there are still several other options.

If you aren’t donating the helmets to such a group, you should immediately cut the chin strap off completely to prevent someone from fishing it out of the trash and attempting to use it. Used helmets can be dangerous to use.

Upcycle as Decorations

Some creative types have found creative ways to use helmets as decorations. You can set up a decorative display of your old helmets on a wall, especially if they were custom painted. Others have taken motorcycle helmets and turned them into flower pots and planters for the garden. You can also buy a lamp kit and turn your old helmet into an interesting desk lamp or outdoor lantern

Check with Local Recycling Center

You can call your local recycling center to see if they accept motorcycle helmets for recycling. Don’t be surprised if the answer is “no.” Due to the different chemicals and materials used in manufacturing safe and sturdy helmets, many recycling centers are not equipped to process them. Those that are may request that you disassemble the helmet before recycling, so be prepared to pull out the padding and foam before you drop if off.

Dispose in Regular Trash

It’s not ideal, but if you have no other options, you can dispose of the helmet in your regular trash. Just make sure that you bag it appropriately, and that you have destroyed it before you do. In addition to cutting off the chin strap, you can also cut it in half with a saw or have some fun with your friends and try to beat it up with an axe or sledgehammer. Just be warned that trying to break a helmet with sheer force is sometimes impossible. After all, they are designed to withstand traumatic impacts at highway speeds.

Haul Away Service

It’s probably not cost effective if you have just one or two helmets to get rid of, but if you have a collection, you could call a rubbish removal service to come and pick them up. This is especially useful if you’ve discovered the helmets while cleaning out an old garage or barn; there’s probably a mess of other stuff you need to get rid of as well, and these services will pick everything up, and then they will do the work of sorting the items for recycling and proper disposal.

Perhaps someday there will be an accepted standard for what to do with used motorcycle helmets, but we’re not there yet. In the meantime, any one of the above methods is an acceptable way to dispose of an old helmet that is no longer safe to wear.  

Sarah Kearns is a hard working mother of three daughters. She is a Senior Communications Manager for BizDb and Population of an online resources with information about businesses and demographic statistics of world population. She loves cooking, reading history books and writing about green living. Her dad was a motorcyclist and he passed that passion on to her. Sarah loves to travel the world on her motorcycle and she hopes that one of her daughters will become her partner in the near future.

April is Motorcycle Helmet Safety month and the supposed start of the riding season in the Northern Hemisphere. So, if your riding season is just beginning or coming to an end you should check your helmet for any issues that could risk your safety.

What do you look for when performing a safety check on your motorcycle helmet? Different manufactures state similar and different things to check, please referrer to your helmets makers directions for the best information.

However, there are some generic checks you can do that will cover many areas to make sure your helmet is still safe. Here are the a few things you need to look for:

1) Is the shell all in one piece? No cracks or splits?

2) Are the straps and connectors in good shape, no adverse wear or tear?

3) The internal padding is connected and stays in place?

4) Remove the padding and check the foam.  Is it dented or have cracks?

5) While looking at the foam, most companies place a sticker printed with the helmet’s birthday. Is it over 5 years old?

6) Does the rest of the internals look in good operating condition?

7) Check the visor for damage that might obscure your vision, can you see clearly?

8) Are the screws or other visor attachments tight?

9) Make sure that insects/creatures are not living in your helmet, see the photos below! (that is a Black Widow Spider)

Checklist item 5 is the 5-year rule.  Most manufactures recommend that after 5 years you replace your helmet.  While the cynical among us will cite the “more money” theory of why they want it replaced there is evidence that the foam lining (the part that does most of the work in a crash) does deteriorate over time. It is your head, so it is your decision to replace or not if everything looks good.

By now most, if not all, motorcycle enthusiasts know about the new Harley Davidson Pan American adventure bike.  I am not going to go over specs or stuff like that. 

Most of the “big time” motorcycle sites have stated that this Harley is going to give the BMW GS a run for the money.  That maybe true as on paper it seems the Pan American has a slight edge, according to those “big time” sites. 

If you want to see for yourself then now is the time.  Harley is taking the Pan American for an on/off road demo tour across the United States. Here is the link for you to SIGN UP for the demo if you interested.

Here are all the sites that the demo tour will stop.

4/16/21 – 4/18/21 – Dallas TX

The Bartonville Store, 96 McMakin Rd., Bartonville, TX, 76226

4/23/21 – 4/25/21 – Albuquerque, NM

Thunderbird Harley-Davidson, 5000 Alameda Blvd NE, 5000 Alameda Blvd NE, NM, 87113

4/30/21 – 5/2/21 – Phoenix, AZ

Westgate Entertainment District, Lot 9, next to Aloft Hotel, 6751 N. Sunset Blvd., Glendale, AZ, 85305

5/14/21 – 5/16/21 San Jose, CA

Metcalf Motorcycle County Park, 300 Metcalf Rd. , San Jose, CA, 95138

5/21/21 – 5/23/21 – Lake Elsinore, CA

Lake Elsinore Motorsports Park, 20700 Cereal St., Lake Elsinore, CA, 92530

5/28/21 – 5/30/21 – Sacramento, CA

Harley-Davidson of Sacramento, 1000 Arden Way, Sacramento, CA, 95815

5/7/21 – 5/9/21 – Las Vegas, NV

Las Vegas Harley-Davidson, 5191 S Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, NV, 89119

7/30/21 – 8/1/21 – Madison, IL

World Wide Technology Raceway, 700 Raceway Blvd, Madison, IL, 62060

7/9/21 – 7/11/21 – Idaho Falls, ID

Grand Teton Harley-Davidson, 848 Houston St , Idaho Falls, ID, 83402

8/13/21 – 8/15/21 – Pittsfield, MA

Ioka Valley Farm, 3475 MA-43, Hancock, MA, 01237

8/6 – 8/8 – Coal Township, PA

Anthracite Outdoor Adventure Area, 4100 PA-125, Coal Township, PA, 17866

9/10/21 – 9/12/21 – Brighton, UT

Brighton Ski Resort, 8302 S Brighton Loop Rd, Brighton, UT, 84121

October 22nd – 24th, 2021 – Southern NY/NJ/CT

Check back soon for more information

October 29th – 31st, 2021 – Loudon, NH

New Hampshire Motor Speedway, 1122 NH-106, Loudon, NH, 03307

Ride On, Ride Safe

OK….. I am a motorcyclist and I was an Army Paratrooper, but this is not something I would ever do! Sorry guys I don’t need to by that Twitter Famous!

I am not going to jump a motorcycle off a cliff!

James Madison’s Montpelier

As noted in in Part 1 of this Quarantine Motorcycle Ride series on the Journey Through Hallowed Ground Byway, had to occur over three seasons.  Part 2 Leesburg to Montpelier occurred last summer.

This leg of the ride started on a cool summer morning.  Blue skies, white puffy clouds, and the local weatherman, promised a comfortable day to ride the motorcycle.

Our eyes and the weatherman were right! Our ride on the Harley Davidson Ultra Limited motorcycle was smooth and sweet.  Great tunes and light traffic made this leg of the Hallowed Ground Byway nothing short of great.

This part of the Byway is packed full of sites that just beg to be stopped and explored as this part of Virginia is packed with history and historical sites.

Getting to Montpelier took us past the following historical sites, and these are the major sites. There are many, many smaller sites in each of the towns you pass through.  This leg of the Hallowed Ground Byway can, by itself, could take a week to work your way though.

Ball’s Bluff Battlefield Regional Park | Nova Parks

George C. Marshall’s Home

President’s Monroe’s Oak Hill

Bull Run Battlefield (1st and 2nd Battle for Manassas)

This section also passes though the Northern Virginia wine and brewery corridor.  For example, there are over a dozen breweries and 30 vineyards in Loudon county alone! Just do not drink and ride, of course!

Of course, the destination of this motorcycle ride was the home of President James Madison’s home Montpelier.  Montpelier was the plantation home of the Madison family, including the fourth President of the United States James Madison and his wife Dolly.

Montpelier is both a National Historic Landmark and part of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.  Completed in 2008 a major restoration (by the National Trust), in part to return the mansion to its original size of 22 rooms.

Archeological investigations provided information on African-American life at the plantation. Philanthropist David Rubenstein funded and enabled the National Trust to restore the slave quarters in the South Yard and open a slavery exhibition, The Mere Distinction of Colour, in 2017.

Getting to Montpelier is a wonderful ride through historic lands.  If you are in the area, on the Journey Thorough Hallowed Ground Byway or not, take the time to stop.