Posts Tagged ‘Motorcycle’

q1

My daughter and grandsons came from Denver to visit!  Ashely only got to spend a short time with us but, the grandsons will spend most of the summer between the two sets of grandparents.  Looking forward to some time with them!

One of the things on Ashley’s “to do” list was a motorcycle ride.  With the Covid quarantine lock down still going on strong in Maryland and Virginia I decided to ride out to Berkeley Springs, WV.q2

Berkeley Springs was the first “spa” in America, where people would go to “take the waters”.  Berkeley Springs history goes back to the at least the 1740s when George Washington reportedly took a bath in the spring water. Berkeley Springs is also on the George Washington Heritage Trail (an America Byway).  I rode this byway a few years ago you can read about it here. An awesome ride for a motorcycle by the way!

Ashley having a good time!

Ashley having a good time!

For our ride we pulled out on the motorcycle mid-morning.  The sun and puffy clouds were out, and the temperature was more than reasonable. A mix of rock and country music playing through the Harley Davidson speakers provided a background soundtrack for our ride.

My plan was to take a lot of backroads and end up at our destination about 1PM.  The motorcycle was humming along as we rode through Virginia and Maryland.  We crossed both the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers as well as Cortactin Mountain and eastern side of the Alleghenies. The views were idyllic and the ride smooth and comfortable.

It couple hours later we arrived in Berkeley Springs. Ashley, much like me, is a bit of a q3history nut and we spent a some time in the museum before our stomachs told us it was lunch time.  Walking down main street we decided to have lunch at the Naked Olive Lounge.  This was a particularly good decision!

They were at serving at a reduced capacity and disinfecting everything as people left, per the Covid free directions. The atmosphere was nice, the wait staff/person was friendly, but the best part was the food, excellent.  I will be going back soon.

After lunch it was time to head back home.  Mounting the motorcycle and pulling out we took a more direct route home. Ashley wanted to go to an antique store before she went back to Denver the next day so she and the wife had their afternoon.

I had a great day out with my daughter!

 

Ride on, Ride Safe

r2w

The 3rd Monday in June is International Ride Your Motorcycle/Scooter to Workday.  This year that is the 15th of June for the calendar challenged out there. 😊

Assuming you are allowed to ride, or you have work to actually ride to.

I have been working from home, so my plan is to ride around the neighborhood a few times before I start my day.

Ride on, Ride Safe

recall

IMPORTANT NOTICE: I have seen a lot of reports on motorcycle recalls, across many brands, regarding brakes and brake pads. 

It might be a time lag between the motorcycle manufacturers and the NHTSA on posting these recalls to the official website but only Aprilia shows up as officially recalled in the USA. 

Please check with your motorcycle maker to double check, so you can actually stop.

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Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others. Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

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Manufacturer Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA

Components ENGINE AND ENGINE COOLING

Summary Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA (Yamaha) is recalling certain 2015-2018 XC155 scooters. The cylinder head nuts may not have been tightened properly and could loosen, allowing coolant to foul the spark plug.

Remedy Yamaha will notify owners and dealers will replace the cylinder head gasket and tighten the cylinder head nuts, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin May 29, 2020. Owners may contact Yamaha customer service at 1-800-962-7926. Yamaha’s number for this recall is 990137.

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Manufacturer Piaggio Group Americas. Inc.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary Piaggio Group Americas, Inc. (Piaggio) is recalling certain 2017-2018 Aprilia RSV4 1000 RF, and 2017-2020 Aprilia RSV4 1000 RR and Aprilia Tuono 1100 RF and RR motorcycles. The front brake pads may corrode, potentially causing the front brake pad friction material to detach from the backing plate.

Remedy

Piaggio will notify owners, and dealers will replace the front brake pads, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin May 22, 2020. Owners may contact Piaggio customer service at 1-212-380-4433. Piaggio’s number for this recall is PA2ZZQ2001.

 

actor

Start Motion Media Production Company is looking for motorcycle riders to “star” in a commercial!  Could it be you?   THIS EXPIRES ON MAY 31 2020, SO GET A MOVE ON!

With a date to be determined Start Motion Media is casting for a motorcycle commercial for a unique “road noise” support safety system for riding, which doubles as a wireless phone.

But of course in the age of COVID they are taking  precautions.  “We are working to keep our locations clean and our staff and communities healthy. We are closely monitoring the COVID-19 situation to make sure we’re doing the right thing for the health and safety of our actors, film crew, and communities.  Given the shoot plan, we can protect our crew and the shoot participants. We are aware of the current regulations in place in Denver, and we are following all of them: gatherings of 6 people or more are restricted, This production will include only 4 total participants onsite – two actors and two crew. “

Not sure why it says Denver in the text above because everything else states that it will occur near Petaluma (Sonoma County) CA.

Of of course there is is this additional requirement, “Please only apply if you are 100% healthy and have had no contact with symptomatic people, additionally we can confirm that all crew onset do meet the same requirement.”

So if you want to be an action star check out their full information page here!

safety

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness month. It is important to get the word out to your non-riding friends and family!

I don’t own any of these photos about motorcycle safety but I have gathered them from across the internet. I think “Fair Use” is in full operation in regards to their use.
So copy and paste these motorcycle safety pictures &, memes. Post them up to all your favorite sites. Point them out to non-riders, we already get it!
Ride safe.

 

ijustwant2ride.com

The DawgHouse Motorcycle Radio…The #1 Motorcycle Show in the US

 

The DawgHouse Motorcycle Radio show opens to big news….. for us!   We are now sponsored by MotoAmerica!!

Supercross super short season?

Rossi Rumors – Phil supports his move to Aprilia

Dirt bike motorcycle park! …. well it did not start out that way.

A Puch motorcycle buried in a backyard.

Click here to listen to the show.

 

recall

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others. Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

*****

Manufacturer Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA

Components ENGINE

Summary

Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA (Yamaha) is recalling certain XV250 motorcycles. An oil passageway in the engine side cover may not be properly manufactured, possibly blocking lubricating oil to the engine.

Remedy

Yamaha will notify owners, and dealers will inspect and replace of the engine side cover, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 17, 2020. Owners may contact Yamaha customer service at 1-800-962-7926. Yamaha’s number for this recall is 990136.

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Manufacturer KTM North America, Inc.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary

KTM North America, Inc. (KTM) is recalling certain 2019-2020 790 Adventure and 790 Adventure R motorcycles. The rear brake hose may overheat, causing the rear brake system to fail.

Remedy

KTM will notify owners, and dealers will install a new rear brake line, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin June 1, 2020. Owners may contact KTM customer service at 1-888-985-6090. KTM’s number for this recall is TB2011.

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Manufacturer Indian Motorcycle Company

Components ENGINE

Summary

Indian Motorcycle Company (Indian) is recalling certain 2020 Challenger motorcycles. The engine output shaft bearing may not have been sufficiently lubricated during assembly, possibly resulting in bearing failure at very low mileage.

Remedy

Indian will notify owners, and dealers will lubricate the output shaft bearings on motorcycles with less than 50 miles on the odometer, free of charge. Motorcycles with greater than 50 miles will not require a repair, and can either be inspected by a dealer, or the owner can self-report the odometer reading directly to Indian. The recall is expected to begin in April 2020. Owners may contact Indian customer service at 1-877-204-3697. Indian’s number for this recall is I-20-02. Note: Owners with an odometer reading of less than 50 miles are advised to not operate their motorcycle until it is repaired.

 

 

 

garage

As long as there has been machinery, there has been mechanical problems, as long as there has been mechanical problems there has been a man or lady that has the skills to repair it.  These highly skilled people either spent most of their young lives as an apprentice or studying at a college to ultimately become the person who repairs your motorcycle, the mechanic.
Photo provided by Mark JamesHistorically, if we have had problems with our motorcycles our first stop would be to reach for the yellow pages and call the nearest affordable garage or bike repair shop. Fortunately for the modern day motorcycle enthusiast things have have changed for the better since the arrival of the internet, the motorcycle owner of today can simply search the internet for a solution to their problem, and within a minutes there is a good chance the owner will find someone who has had the same issue, and possibility a solution, this information may come in the form of a blog, a forum thread, Facebook groups, Reddit posts or even a YouTube videos.
Although information alone is no substitute for good old fashioned experience, there is allot to be said for “the have go hero’s” amongst us, at the end of the day there is a sense of pride and achievement when we repair our own things, this is not to mention the money we can save be doing it ourselves.
Despite the wealth of mechanical information on the internet there can be no betterPhoto provided by Mark James source of information than a official workshop manual, these manuals are developed and written by the manufactures of the motorcycles, so its fair to say the information within the pages of these documents is gold.
One of the best investments any motorcyclist can have is an automotive eManual, these very detailed step by step documents can hold the hand of the most inexperienced arm chair mechanic, and walk them through the most complex of tasks. Unlike their hard-copy cousins, these eManuals are easier to access and are more of a sustainable option.
One of the largest databases of motorcycle eManuals on the internet is located in the UK, RepairBooks.co.uk is a family run business and was established in 1999, with a growing inventory of over 12,000 titles. Any manual that is not listed on their database can be sourced within a short period of time.

Mark James is an car and motorcycle mechanic with over 25 years in the automotive industry. Head of department at Nissan Sunderland, England for 10 years.

Beer is a very dangerous thing isn’t it.

For sure it has the ability to dull the senses, but it can also open up a world of free thinking.

sam-manicom-banner-aug18v5

I’m often asked what it was that started me down the road on what turned out to be an eight year motorcycle journey around the world. Perhaps I should be red-faced about this, but as it’s the truth and it led to so much fun, some excellent challenges and so many opportunities to learn, I’m not embarrassed at all. The idea started in drunken moment in a bar on the tiny Channel Island of Jersey!

I was working on the island, which is tucked in the English Channel between the UK and France, and I following a career path, as you are supposed to do as an adult. I’ve travelled a lot during my life but had eventually settled down, thinking that perhaps it was time to grow up and to be sensible. After all, we are supposed to feather our nests for old age aren’t we. Besides that, developing a career was going to be a new challenge. I’d not really done it before, so why not see what it was all about.

I surprised myself at how well I did in my retail manager role. Taken on as a very junior manager, I advanced fairly rapidly through the ranks and had all the trappings of life that one is supposed to have with success. An apartment, a sports car, holidays abroad and so on. I think the keys were that people matter to me, I’m fairly organized, I find it easy to respect the people I’m working with, and I liked looking after customers.

My staff and I had fun and we were successful. The Jersey shop was the number five store out of scores of branches throughout the UK, but there was something missing. I had itchy feet, and the itch was increasing dramatically each week, but I worked on, telling myself that bunking off on another long trip was irresponsible. After all, I was 34; supposedly at the peak of my professional career.

One night in the pub over a bit of a solo celebration when the beers were slipping down rather wonderfully, my thoughts had turned to the itch. By the time I’d made it to the 4th beer I’d realized two important points. Other than work, I had absolutely no responsibilities, and I had savings. What a brilliant combination.

The next beer slipped down dangerously and I started to ponder that call of the road. Perhaps I should push off on a new adventure. Would I ever be in this position of potential freedom again? I’d be giving up a lot though…

I was born and brought up in the Belgian Congo in Central West Africa. I was 10 years SM 9old when my parents decided that it was time to take my sisters and me to live in the UK. I think that was a really hard decision for them. Life had revolved around their work in the Congo for so many years. It certainly was odd for me to go from my usual attire of a pair of shorts and a great tan, to wearing full English school uniform; even a tie and a cap! I was known as Jungle Boy for quite a few years as I came to terms with life in England. I must have been quite a strange little lad as far as the other kids were concerned. A python? So what. But apples, chocolate bars and the Beatles? All new to me.

I made my first solo trip as a foray into mainland Europe, age 16. I rode a brand new bicycle, that I’d worked doing odd jobs to save the money for. That first trip taught me that destinations don’t matter, other than as a plan. What matters is that you go, and that you appreciate the things and people you see and get involved with along the way. Back then I’d no idea that this was going to turn into a plan for life; value the moments.

On finishing school age 18, I’d no idea what I was going to do. Having been to multiple schools, and spent most of my time trying to fit in with each new environment, plus of course buzzing around on the sports field, my grades weren’t very good. University was out! I chose to work a retail management training course for three years with one of the UK’s leading department stores.

Of course, at the time I’d no idea how much the training, new skills and character building would stand me in good stead. I probably couldn’t successfully do what I do now had it not been for all of the training that was involved in those teen years.

Sm 11At the end of those three years, the open road was calling and I set off to spend a year hitch hiking around Europe. With that trip, life changed. It wasn’t hard to make this become a way of living. Work and travel; sometimes combining both. Many of the jobs were basic and low wage, but with each new job I learnt; about the role itself, myself, and the country I was in. I travelled as far as India and Australia. Over the next years I hitch-hiked, bused, trained, hiked, sailed and had a go at every form of getting around that I could.

And then the career in retail management took over. The trouble was, at no time in my life had I felt as alive, as challenged, as amazed, as delighted and at times frightened, as when I was on the move in some different land. One of my favorite sayings is ‘Become a stranger in a strange land’.

As I was sitting drinking those beers in the Jersey pub, that saying was in my mind. I started to ponder the possibilities; where to go and how to go? What didn’t I like about the other ways I’d travelled? I loved hitch-hiking but I’d done that a lot. So what’s new? I’d really enjoyed the pace and challenge of bicycling, but those head winds weren’t something I looked forward to. I also knew that I wanted the ability to cover more ground in whatever time I could make available. Cycling was out then, and so was travelling by bus or by train. Unable to stop on previous trips, I’d zipped on past things, people and places that had looked interesting.

My beery brain was hunting for a new way to travel. A way to solve the issues I was identifying, and give me new things to learn. Slowly my mind worked around to travelling by motorcycle. I knew I wanted to travel through Africa too. I wanted to see if my childhood memories about how things sound smelt and tasted were true. The only problem was, I didn’t know how to ride a motorcycle!

I handed in my notice at work the next morning. I had a bit of a hangover but I was convinced that I was doing the right thing. I then bought myself a little 125cc trail bike to learn on, and passed my test 6 weeks later. It wasn’t long before I’d made it to the edge of the Sahara. Sitting on my 800cc BMW motorcycle, I looked south over the Egyptian sands and contemplated the point that quite likely I was a complete idiot! I mean, ride a motorcycle through Africa with just a few months experience? For sure I was incompetent and perhaps quite mad, but it was too late; I was there. And anyway, I’d told my mates in the pub what I was doing. I couldn’t deal with the loss of face if I turned back without even trying.

sm 6So the journey through Africa began. The original plan, if I dare call it that with things happening at such a pace, was to ride through West Africa. Just as I passed my motorcycle test, things went politically pear-shaped in Algeria, and all the borders in that part of Africa closed. No one had the remotest idea how long this situation was going to continue; my heart had sunk. But I started to look for a plan B – I had a ticking clock in my mind. Because of the terrain and the extreme temperatures, there are only certain months of the year when it’s sane to travel across the Sahara. If I didn’t crack on I’d lose the opportunity.

The alternative route was through East Africa. The problem there was that Sudan had a North to South civil war going on, and Ethiopia had been at war within itself for the past 20 years. On the up side, some people were getting visas for Sudan, and the war in Ethiopia was just coming to an end. With nothing to lose, I set off with new rough plans in mind; I might as well try. After all, I’d given up my job, and sold just about everything I owned. What hadn’t occurred to me was that Mike, and Sally, who I’d met on the way, and I were to be the first people to ride motorcycles North to South through Sudan and Ethiopia for those 20 years. We’d struck it lucky. A window of opportunity had opened.

This was 1992. No Google, no GPS, no cell phones and no digital photography. If you wanted to find something out you went to the library or wrote letters. If you wanted to find the way, you hunted out the best maps you could, and you asked for directions. Getting lost was a part of the journey, and instead of being a negative it simply opened up a world of the unexpected. I still believe that some of the best adventures happen on a road you hadn’t planned to be travelling.

19 fascinating countries and a year later, I decided that actually there was no good sm 10reason to head for home. There were plenty of reasons to carry on though. Travelling by motorcycle, in spite of being thrown in prison in Tanzania and 17 bone fractures in the desert in Namibia, was more than fulfilling my beery thoughts in the pub. Another favorite saying is ‘Stop worrying about the potholes and celebrate the journey’.

I booked passage for my bike and I to sail on a container ship across the Indian Ocean to Australia. And so, what turned out to be the eight year journey around the world had begun. My motorcycle is called Libby. That’s short for Liberty; it’s what she gives me. All these years later, she’s still my only means of transport in the UK. She does now have a younger sister getting me around in the USA on trips there. A 2013 BMW F800GS. That bike is called ‘Lucky’. For sure I know how lucky I am to have her, and the opportunity to explore more of the amazing land that is the USA.

I think of myself as being a bit of an accidental author. I didn’t set out on my journey with the aim of writing magazine articles or books. With enthusiastic encouragement from others I thought I’d have a go. I’d kept a journal every day, so I had the facts and many of the descriptions. Long term travelers learn quickly about the risk of being on intake overload each day; it’s so easy to forget the dates, statistics, sights, sounds, smells, names and so on. The drama and the funny side to life do tend to stay in one’s mind though.

Seeing if I could write a book would be a new adventure. I was putting in 10-12 hour days working renovating semi-derelict houses and then after a quick shower and some food, I sat down to write. It took me two years. Learning everything about the publishing and print industries was been a side fascination, and I’ll never forget the sensation of having my first printed copy in my hand; it’s a wonderful moment. I certainly didn’t expect the 5 star reviews my books have been collecting from kind readers and media reviewers.

sm 8What next? More travels but in shorter stints; I need just enough to keep scratching that itch and to give me material to write travel articles. I also send a fair bit of time doing travel presentations and book signings at motorcycle dealerships, libraries, clubs, schools and businesses. They are my opportunity to share the fun of the road, and perhaps even encourage others to head out and to explore for themselves.

I’m keen that people really think about life, recognize the opportunities as they occur, and take advantage of them. This is such an invigorating thing, both at work and play. I fully accept that many people have responsibilities that will not allow them to head out into the blue for months even years at a time and I really value being around people like that who are accepting their responsibilities and making life zing as much as they can. I love it when people say such things as, “I’d love to travel, but I can’t, yet.” Adventures begin with dreams.

Each of the four books takes the reader riding and exploring through a different section SM 7of the eight year journey and thankfully people seem to like them. I think of my books as being a way to share the fun of the open road with those who for the moment can’t head out on a long trip. With those who really don’t want to travel but love to read about it, and also as encouragement to those who think they don’t have the skills to travel in this way. I had few skills when I started, but I had an open mind, a strong curiosity, and an understanding of the value of respect. I’ve got a positive attitude too. It’s a great world and travelling by motorcycle, to my mind, is a superb way to see it.

 

Sam’s Books

Sm 13Into Africa Takes the reader on that first eye-opening year through the incredible continent that is Africa. There are challenges a plenty; it’s a genuine tale of the unexpected. Woven into this journey between Cairo and Cape Town are the riding, the people, wildlife, history, the disasters and the silver linings; there’s plenty of humor too.

Overland Magazine: ‘The word-pictures that bring a good travel book to life are all here; Sam’s perceptions of people, places and predicaments have real depth and texture, their associated sights, smells and sounds are evoked with a natural ease. Where other author’s detailed descriptions can sometimes get in the way, Sam’s style is engaging and well-tuned. I found myself in the midst of action rather than a mere fly on the wall.’

 

sm 1Under Asian Skies This is the story of just nearly 3 years travelling from Australia and New Zealand, up through SE Asia, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Iran, Turkey and through Eastern Europe. This without doubt is the most colorful and culturally diverse part of the world I’ve been lucky enough to ride. Every day was an adventure.

Horizons Unlimited: ‘Sam has the skills of the story teller and this book easily transports you into three years of journey across Asia. He manages to bring the sounds, scents and heat of Asia to life without wordy overkill and he has obviously researched his historical facts carefully. In places Under Asian Skies is sad, and in others it’s outrageously funny – look out for his battle with the Sydney port officials and the bus ride in Indonesia. All in all this is a really good read, whether you have been across Asia, or are planning a trip. This is true travelling on the cheap and not your everyday story.’

SM 2Distant Suns My third book has me linking up with a German lass in New Zealand. Birgit agreed to ride with me, but to Africa first, and on her own bike. She rode out of Mombasa harbor in Kenya with just 600 miles of experience on a motorcycle! Over the next 3 years we rode together through Africa, and on up through South and Central America. These continents may be on the same latitude, but the contrasts in landscape, cultures and the peoples are huge. The Andes? Simply stunning. Oh and I’d not told Birgit what a disaster magnet I am!

Motorcycle Explorer: ‘An epic ride that almost becomes secondary to the events that happen and the very human element of travelling. Sam never forgets to use his five senses in his tales; leaving you immersed in the sights, sounds, touch, smell and taste of a journey of true human discovery.’

 

Layout 1Tortillas to Totems: This book takes you travelling with us through the 3 countries that make up North America. Three neighbors that are so wonderfully different to each other, make travelling this part of the world a delight. North America was in fact the part of the world that surprised me the most. When you read this book you’ll find out all the reasons why I keep coming back.

ADVMoto Magazine: ‘What I enjoy most about Sam’s method is his way of describing the moment. You feel it, smell it… you freeze, you sweat, and you see what’s before him like you’re along for the ride. You are very much there. It’s a rather intimate, honest style that easily carries you from chapter-to-chapter. I highly recommend that you add Sam’s books to your reading list.’

About the Author: Sam Manicom travelled the world on his trusty 1992 BMW R80GS, with his partner Birgit on her 1971 BMW R60/5.

He has been writing for various magazines around the world since 1996. Those titles include: Motorcycle Sport & Leisure, Adventure Bike Rider, Motorcycle Voyager, Canadian Biker, Motorcycle Monthly, Motociclisimo, Motorcycle Explorer, Australian Road Rider, MCN and ADVMoto Magazine.

He is the author of 4 acclaimed motorcycle travel books. His first book was written as a result of readers’ letters to editors. ‘We like Sam’s articles. When’s he going to write a book?’  Until that time he’d been travelling with just new adventures in mind.

Signed copies are available from Sam-Manicom.com with free UK delivery, and with free Worldwide delivery via the Book Depository.com https://www.bookdepository.com/author/Sam-Manicom

Sam’s 4 books are also available for download as Kindles and as Audiobooks. Sam narrates the books himself.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Kindle-Store-Sam-Manicom/s?rh=n%3A341677031%2Cp_27%3ASam+Manicom

https://www.audible.co.uk/search?searchNarrator=Sam+Manicom

https://books.apple.com/us/author/sam-manicom/id516565970

Facebook – Catch up with Sam via his two pages: Sam Manicom and Adventure Motorcycle Travel Books by Sam Manicom.

Twitter – You’ll find him on @SamManicom

Instagram – sammanicom.author

Website – If you’d like to learn more about his books and his presentation schedule please go to www.sam-manicom.com

Sam is Co-Host of Adventure Rider Radio RAW show. Hosted by Jim Martin, the show is recorded monthly with a panel of 5 highly experienced overlanders from around the world. Listeners submit topics for discussion. RAW has been described by listeners as akin to sitting around a giant kitchen table with the team, beers, wine and coffee in hand, discussing motorcycles and travel; there’s controversy, challenging ideas, top tips and plenty of banter!

https://adventureriderradio.com/arr-raw/

Sam says, “If you are a You Tube fan, have a hunt. There are various riding and interview clips to be found, including a recent chat with the phenomenal Ted Simon.”   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-658_CSkrA

He was the first Overlander Interviewed by Adventure Bike TV for their popular ‘Under the Visor’ series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bToV6paAEXM

In 2017 Overland Magazine awarded him the Roho Ya Kusafiri Spirit of Travel’ award for his contribution to Overland and Adventure Travel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1Y1BKPbp_Y

motorcycle-helmet-after-accident

April is Motorcycle Helmet Safety month and the supposed start of the riding season in the Northern Hemisphere. So, if your riding season is just beginning or coming to an end you should check your helmet for any issues that could risk your safety.

What do you look for when performing a safety check on your motorcycle helmet? Different manufactures state similar and different things to check, please referrer to your helmets makers directions for the best information.

However, there are some generic checks you can do that will cover many areas to make sure your helmet is still safe. Here are the a few things you need to look for:

1) Is the shell all in one piece? No cracks or splits?

2) Are the straps and connectors in good shape, no adverse wear or tear?h7

3) The internal padding is connected and stays in place?

4) Remove the padding and check the foam.  Is it dented or have cracks?

5) While looking at the foam, most companies place a sticker printed with the helmet’s birthday. Is it over 5 years old?

6) Does the rest of the internals look in good operating condition?

7) Check the visor for damage that might obscure your vision, can you see clearly?

8) Are the screws or other visor attachments tight?

9) Make sure that insects/creatures are not living in your helmet, see the photos below!

Checklist item 5 is the 5-year rule.  Most manufactures recommend that after 5 years you replace your helmet.  While the cynical among us will cite the “more money” theory of why they want it replaced there is evidence that the foam lining (the part that does most of the work in a crash) does deteriorate over time. It is your head, so it is your decision to replace or not if everything looks good.

For more you can check out HelmetCheck.org.