Posts Tagged ‘Sportbike’

ijustwant2ride.com

This is my take on motorcycle news that grabbed my attention. There is a whole lot more out there, but this is the news that I want to discuss. Drop me a note if you disagree with my take.

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Up Shift – Moto Guzzi Experience  

Moto Guzzi is helping more of us to get back to normal in the post pandemic world by offering events around the world.  These events are going to be held in 9 countries including the US.  Some of the events have already occurred like the ones in Corsica and Crete but others are still to come.  You can check out this website for detail for global events but look her (RideApart) for info on the US rides.   

My Take – I am so happy to see events like these make a comeback.  Harley Davidson has done so with their regional HOG rallies and having Moto Guzzi doing their thing is great!

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Down Shift – E15 fuel is getting a special dispensation this summer. Normally E15 is removed from the fuel supply, because of pollution concerns.  This year it is going to stick around in an attempt to lower gas prices as E15 is normally 5-10 cents a gallon cheaper. E15, by the way, means that the fuel has up to 15% ethanol.

Please be aware that E15 fuel is bad for your motorcycle (and other small engines).  Manufacturers state that using E15 will cause damage to your engine AND the EPA has not certified any motorcycles or ATVs for fuel with more than 10% ethanol.

“E15 has been shown to damage carbureted and fuel-injected motorcycles, reduce gas mileage and decrease shelf life of the gasoline,” said AMA Director of Government Relations Michael Sayre. “The fact that it is illegal to use in motorcycles, and that clear labeling at the pump is not required, poses a significant risk for misfuelling.”

My Take – The current administration has taken this action, among other things, to reduce the “pain at the pump”.  The American Motorcyclist Association and the Motorcycle Riders Foundation both have taken action to make sure that proper labeling of pumps and rider education on the action are occurring.

So, what is more important the price of fuel or the environment or poll numbers…. You make your pick.

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Ride on, Ride Safe

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V217000

Manufacturer Piaggio Group Americas, Inc.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary Piaggio Group Americas, Inc. (Piaggio) is recalling certain 2020-2021 MP3 500 HPE scooters. The brake hose terminal fittings zinc plating may contaminate the brake fluid, decreasing brake performance.

Remedy Dealers will perform a complete brake system flush, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed April 18, 2022. Owners may contact Piaggio customer service at 1-212-380-4400.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V207000

Manufacturer Triumph Motorcycles America, Ltd.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary Triumph Motorcycles America, Ltd. (Triumph) is recalling certain 2022 Speed Triple RS and Speed Triple RR motorcycles. The rear brake disc bolts may loosen.

Remedy Dealers will replace the rear brake disc bolts, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed April 29, 2022. Owners may contact Triumph customer service at 1-678-854-2010. Triumph’s number for this recall is SRAN 596.

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Manufacturer Arcimoto Inc

Components SERVICE BRAKES

Summary Arcimoto Inc (Arcimoto) is recalling certain 2020-2022 Deliverator, 2019-2022 FUV, 2021-2022 Rapid Responder, and 2020-2022 Roadster motorcycles. The brake pressure switch may corrode after exposure to salt and chemicals found in de-icers, causing the brake lights to illuminate constantly.

Remedy Owners will be notified by mail and instructed to contact Arcimoto to schedule a service appointment to have the brake pressure switch inspected and dielectric grease added to the connection to prevent the brake lights from remaining on. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed on May 2, 2022. Owners may contact Arcimoto customer service at 1-541-683-6293.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22E022000

Manufacturer Midwest Motorsports LLC

Components EQUIPMENT

Summary Midwest Motorsports LLC (Midwest) is recalling certain Kylin helmets, model number K77, in sizes L, XL and XXL. The helmets may not adequately protect the wearer in the event of a head impact during a crash. As such, these helmets fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 218, “Motorcycle Helmets.”

Remedy Midwest will notify the helmet purchasers and instruct them to return the helmets for a full refund. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed May 6, 2022. Owners may contact Midwest customer service at 1-616-935-7443.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

On May 7th, 2022, women across the world will be riding their motorcycles for the 16th annual International Female Ride Day!  For 16 years the IFRD has “shined a spotlight on women riders and females in the motorsports arena!”

Nearly 20% of riders are women and that number has been growing over the years and I do not expect that growth to end anytime soon. Coming out of the pandemic more people and especially women are feeling empowered to do the things that they really want.

The goals of the event are:

  • Highlight the number of women who ride.
  • Encourage other women to take up the activity
  • Raise awareness about women’s equality in motorsports
  • Celebrate women’s advancement in motorsports and powersports
  • Ride for accelerated gender parity.

Are you going to participate?  If so, submit your photos to the IFRD photo gallery for a chance to participate in the photo challenge sweepstakes.  And while there are no prizes here, you could post to the comments section to show us what you were doing!


Ride on, Ride safe

Your motorcycle helmet is your most important piece of equipment so keeping it clean is important.  Not just from an appearance perspective but as a method to ensure it is still in good working condition. Also, April is Motorcycle Helmet Awareness month so now is a good time to do the work!

While you are cleaning your helmet look for cracks in the shell, that the hard foam is intact and in good condition (this is the part that does most of the work to protect your head) and all the other parts are in good order.  

Before you start… read your owner’s manual on cleaning your specific motorcycle helmet.

1 – First thing is to clean the exterior of the motorcycle helmet. Using a wet microfiber cloth or a paper towel, lay it across the visor and helmet shell for at least 10 minutes. This will soften the baked-on bugs and cruds allowing them to be wiped away reducing the chance to scratch or damage the finish. You may have to repeat this step.

2 – Remove the visor after you have cleaned the exterior. Use warm soapy water to really get the visor clean inside and out. Rinse, dry and reassemble your helmet.

3 – The visor needs special attention. DO NOT use any products that have acid or ammonia!  Even products with citric acid can damage the visor.  Most glass cleaners have some form of acid or ammonia so pay close attention or just avoid them. Warm soapy water and microfiber cloth is the best way to safely clean your visor.

4 – Make sure you clean the visor mechanism.  Keeping the mechanism clean will ensure it works as designed.

5 – Does your helmet have a sun visor?  If it does clean it in the same manner, you cleaned the visor.  No ammonia or acid-based cleaners!

6 – Next up is the interior of your motorcycle helmet.  Most helmets allow you to remove the interior padding. Look at your owner’s manual for directions on removing the padding. Some manufactures allow you to use a washing machine and other recommend hand cleaning in warm soapy water.  If you use the hand method, I recommend using a baby shampoo.

7 – If your helmet’s padding is not removable follow the instructions your helmet manufacture provides. But, in my opinion, dunking the entire helmet into soapy water is not the way to go.  It takes forever to dry; it can mildew, and I am always unsure if it can damage the underlying foam.  My suggestion is to use a motorcycle helmet sanitizing spray.

8 – Check the air vents to make sure they are clean, and function as designed. A shot of compressed air, from the inside, might dislodge dried road grime and bugs.

9 – Put it back together, following the manufacturer’s instructions, if you still have them.


Ride on, Ride safe

There are a lot of things you can do with old motorcycle helmets. Make planters or art with them for example.

But one of the most important things you can do with those old motorcycle helmets is to donate them to emergency services. Why? Because they need to train to deal with motorcycle accidents and how to handle the helmets is one of the things they need to practice.

This month IJustWant2Ride.com and The Dawghouse Motorcycle Radio show donated 10 old helmets to the Front Royal Fire Department. With April being Motorcycle Helmet Safety Month, it was the right time to get rid of the old lids.

April is Motorcycle Helmet Safety month so now is a good time to make sure your lid is in good shape.  You should, at least once a year, check your helmet to make sure it is in good shape, as it is your primary safety tool. I just bought new helmets, read on to find out why.

What should you look at while checking your helmet? Here are 9 items you should look at when assessing your motorcycle helmet for use in another year:

1) Is the shell all in one piece?  Are there cracks or splits?

2) Are the straps and connectors in good shape, no adverse wear or tear?

3) Is the internal padding is connected and stays in place?

4) Remove the padding and check the foam.  Is it dented or has cracks?

5) While looking at the foam, most companies place a sticker printed with the “birthday” of your helmet.  Is it over 5 years old?

6) Does the rest of the internals look in good operating conditions?

7) Check the visor for damage that might obscure your vision, can you see clearly?

8) Are the screws or other visor attachments tight and is the visor working as expected?

9 Make sure that insects/creatures are not living in your helmet, see photo below!

Let’s talk about item 5, the 5-year rule.  Most manufactures recommend that you replace your helmet after 5 years. The sceptic in us will think “more sells = more money” for the motorcycle helmet makers. The reason, they state, is that the foam between the padding and shell will deteriorate over time reducing its ability to protect your skull.

I believe in the 5-year rule, but I also check every year.  I just replaced my 7-year-old Nolan motorcycle helmet this month.  Why? When I ran my hands over the foam it no longer felt as smooth as it once did. It is hard to describe but, I felt that the foam was starting to show its age and we needed new helmets.

It is your head; I hope these checks help you out.  


Ride on, Ride safe

ijustwant2ride.com

This is my take on motorcycle news that grabbed my attention. There is a whole lot more out there, but this is the news that I want to discuss. Drop me a note if you disagree with my take.

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Up Shift – Arizona has joined several other states in allowing motorcycles LANE FILITERING.  Just to be clear Lane Filtering allows motorcycle to move between STOPPED vehicles.  Lane Splitting allows motorcycles to move between moving vehicles.

Molded after the law Utah passed a few years ago Arizona riders can, when the law comes into effect, filter between 1) stopped cars, 2) on roads with the speed limit under 45 MPH, 3) the road must have 2 or more lanes moving in the same direction, 4) the motorcycle cannot exceed 15 MPH. 

My Take – This is a good thing!  It will be a mess at first as everyone learns the new rules but in the long run it will save lines as fewer bikers are killed in rear in accidents (get off your phones) at red lights.

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Down Shift – In what has become an all-time bad April Fool’s joke MotorcycleSports.net has issued an apology. What did they do? How about a headline of “Diplopia wins and March Marquez ends is career”. This headline and the associated article really irritated Honda.

My Take – Well not the best April Fool’s joke I have ever seen but Honda seems to believe they and Marquez were harmed. I think they think too highly of themselves. 

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Ride on, Ride Safe

We were able to sneak out for about 2-hour motorcycle ride this past weekend.  Still a lot going on in life/work, so I am just happy to get out on the motorcycle.

Motorcycling around Front Royal, VA and the surrounding area is a lot of fun.  More than a few nice places as destinations and more than a few good country roads to ride.

We even got up on Skyline Drive for a short ride. The leaves have not yet reappeared on the trees, so the views were spectacular!

The curiosity of the day was the “Audi” Can Am Spyder.  The reality was the guy was not happy with the big, black, empty area on the front of his trike and put the Audi badge there.  It was a neat conversation starter.
Ride on, Ride safe

My wife mentioned that this is Women’s History month and that I should post something, just not photos of her. LOL

I went back into my vintage photo folder to look for those “old school photos of women and motorcycles. Women have been riding motorcycles from the start and these photos prove that women JustWant2ride.

Ride On, Ride Safe

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22E009000

Manufacturer Fuel Helmets

Components EQUIPMENT

Summary: Fuel Helmets is recalling certain SH-WS001 motorcycle helmets, part number SH-WS0016, size Large. The helmet may not adequately protect the wearer in the event of a head impact during a crash. As such, these helmets fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 218, “Motorcycle Helmets.”

Remedy : Fuel Helmets will notify owners, and provide a credit to replace the helmet or reimburse the cost of the helmet. The manufacturer has not yet provided a schedule for recall notification. Owners may contact Fuel Helmets customer service at 1-855-355-3835.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V062000

Manufacturer Triumph Motorcycles America, Ltd.

Components STRUCTURE

Summary: Triumph Motorcycles America, Ltd. (Triumph) is recalling certain 2022 Trident motorcycles. The side stand may not support the weight of the motorcycle and bend, causing the motorcycle to become unstable while parked.

Remedy: Dealers will replace the side stand, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 24, 2022. Owners may contact Triumph customer service at 1-678-854-2010. Triumph’s number for this recall is SRAN 593.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22E006000

Manufacturer Nexxpro – Fabrica de Capacetes, S.A.

Components EQUIPMENT

Summary: Nexxpro-Fabrica de Capacetes, S.A. (Nexxpro) is recalling certain X.R2 motorcycle helmets, part number 01XR22312455100M, in size M. Due to a manufacturing error, the helmets may not adequately protect the wearer in the event of a head impact during a crash. As such, these helmets fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 218, “Motorcycle Helmets.”

Remedy: Nexxpro will notify owners and replace the helmets, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 15, 2022. Owners may contact Nexxpro customer service at 1-800-461-1226.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V061000

Manufacturer Honda (American Honda Motor Co.)

Components ENGINE AND ENGINE COOLING

Summary: Honda (American Honda Motor Co) is recalling certain 2021 CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP motorcycles. Under certain driving conditions, the exhaust pipe may overheat, which could melt the oil cooler pipe and cause it to rupture.

Remedy: Dealers will replace the oil cooler pipe and install a heat guard between the exhaust pipe and oil cooler pipe, free of charge. Letters notifying owners of the safety risk are expected to be mailed March 14, 2022. A second letter will be sent once the remedy is available. Owners are advised not to ride their motorcycle above 5,000 RPM in 1st gear until the recall repair is complete. Owners may contact Honda customer service at 1-866-784-1870. Honda’s number for this recall is KN3.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V030000

Manufacturer Harley-Davidson Motor Company

Components ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

Summary: Harley Davidson Motor Company (Harley-Davidson) is recalling certain 2021 Pan America 1250S (RA1250S), Pan America 1250 (RA1250), and Sportster S (RH1250S) motorcycles. The instrument cluster module may not display the speedometer and neutral indicator at start-up when the module is below freezing temperatures. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 123, “Motorcycle Controls and Displays.”

Remedy: Dealers will update the instrument cluster module software, free of charge. Owner notification letters were mailed February 8, 2022. Owners may contact Harley-Davidson customer service at 1-800-258-2464. Harley-Davidson’s number for this recall is 0631.

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Ride On, Ride Safe