Posts Tagged ‘motorcycle safety’

I have ridden along many national parkways including the Natchez Trace (TN/MS), Great Lake Seaway Byway (NY), Blue Ridge Parkway (VA, NC) and, of course, the Skyline Drive Parkway (VA). I have also attended multiple motorcycle rallies along the east coast including Daytona.

Outside of rallies, I have never seen as many motorcycles in one location as I do in Front Royal, Virginia. During motorcycle riding season, it is not uncommon to see hundreds of motorcycles in Front Royal, either singular or riding in large groups daily. You can see these large numbers of motorcycles passing through almost every day but especially on weekends. In my opinion Front Royal could be the motorcycle destination of Virgina much like Tail of the Dragon in Tennessee.

Why are so many motorcycles passing through Front Royal? It is because the town is located at the northern terminus of Skyline Drive and about an hour from the nation’s capital.  All these motorcycle riders are passing through the town on the way to Skyline Drive or to parts unknown as they leave the Parkway.

By just passing through Front Royal motorcyclists are missing out on opportunities for some great local rides and the great local flavor.  For example, a rider can take a loop from Front Royal to Luray via Fort Valley Road. That ride would last about two+ hours, depending on stops, and would have you back in town by lunch time.

After lunch, mount the motorcycle and head south out of town to cross under Skyline Drive at it two gaps.  But be careful, they are quite technical, and the northern gap is designated as a high crash area. Two+ hours later you will be back in town with enough time to get to dinner and a stroll along main street.

After dinner, riders could visit the Virginia Beer Museum for brew and live music or Shenandoah Valley Axe Throwing for a unique activity or any of the many other venues in town.  Front Royal has lots of hotels and restaurants and a main street that could be considered a throw-back to another era. Check out the movie theater that has a 1950’s vibe with a state-of-the-art projector and sound system.

Front Royal may be the gateway to Skyline Drive, but it should also be a destination at the start or end of your motorcycle ride.  Stay a day or two, there are plenty of hotels and campgrounds, to explore both our local roads and our small-town atmosphere.

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

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Manufacturer Irbit Motorworks of America, Inc.

Components WHEELS

Summary Irbit Motorworks of America, Inc. (Irbit) is recalling certain 2012-2017 Ural Gear Up, Ural Patrol (T), Ural Retro, 2012-2015 Ural Tourist (T), and 2015-2017 Ural cT motorcycles. The wheel spokes may have been improperly tightened, which can damage the rims or cause a wheel lock-up.

Remedy Dealers will replace the wheel rims, spokes, tubes, and rim strips, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed August 1, 2022. Owners may contact Irbit customer service at 1-425-702-8484. This recall excludes wheel rims previously replaced by warranty and/or under NHTSA Recall No. 13V-507.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V403000

Manufacturer Zero Motorcycles Inc.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary Zero Motorcycles Inc. (Zero) is recalling certain 2022 SR and SR/F motorcycles. Incorrect front brake caliper bolts may have been installed and could damage the mounting threads on the fork, causing the caliper to loosen.

Remedy Dealers will inspect and as necessary, replace the front brake caliper bolts and forks, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed June 27, 2022. Owners may contact Zero customer service at 1-888-841-8085. Zero’s number for this recall is SV-RCL-022-004.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V397000

Manufacturer Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A. (KMC) is recalling certain 2020-2021 LX230A and 2022 LX230G motorcycles. The incorrect front brake rotor may have been installed, which can reduce brake performance. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 122, “Motorcycle Brake Systems.”

Remedy Dealers will replace the front brake rotor and pads, as necessary, free of charge. The manufacturer has not yet provided a schedule for recall notification. Owners may contact KMC customer service at 1-866-802-9381. KMC’s number for this recall is MC22-04

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22E044000

Manufacturer Milwaukee Performance Helmets

Components EQUIPMENT

Summary Milwaukee Performance Helmets (Milwaukee Helmets) is recalling certain size large model MPH9720DOT and size small model MPH9721DOT helmets. The helmets may lack proper retention system integrity, penetration protection, and labels. As such, these helmets fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 218, “Motorcycle Helmets.”

Remedy Milwaukee Helmets will offer a refund of the purchase price. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed July 25, 2022. Owners may contact Milwaukee Helmets customer service at 1-800-990-7423 or Helmet-recall@shafinc.com.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V352000

Manufacturer Bombardier Recreational Products, Inc.

Components POWER TRAIN

Summary Bombardier Recreational Products, Inc. (BRP) is recalling certain 2015-2019 Can-Am Spyder F3 and RT motorcycles. The front sprocket may be defective and prematurely wear, resulting in a loss of drive power.

Remedy Dealers will perform an interim repair until parts become available. Once parts are available, the front sprocket will be replaced, free of charge. Owner notification letters were mailed May 26, 2022. Owners may contact BRP customer service at 1-888-272-9222.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

*****

NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V325000

Manufacturer Beta USA

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary Beta USA (Beta) is recalling certain 2022 350 RR-S, 390 RR-S, 430 RR-S, and 500 RR-S motorcycles. An incorrect front brake hose was installed during production.

Remedy Beta will replace the front brake hose, free of charge. Owner notification letters were mailed May 24 2022. Owners may contact Beta customer service at 1-805-226-4035. Beta’s number for this recall is R-2022-1.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22T006000

Manufacturer Continental Tire the Americas, LLC

Components TIRES

Summary Continental Tire the Americas, LLC. (Continental Tire) is recalling certain TKC80, ContiGo!, K62, and LB Continental Motorcycle tires. Please refer to the recall report for specific tire information. Cracks longer than 3/16 inch may develop in the tread grooves. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 119, “New Pneumatic Tires-Other Than Passenger Cars.”

Remedy Continental Tire will notify owners and replace the affected tires, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed June 6, 2022. Owners may contact Continental customer service at 1-888-799-2168.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22E036000

Manufacturer Performance Machine, Inc.

Components EQUIPMENT

Summary Performance Machine, Inc. (Performance Machine) is recalling certain Burly Brand Dominator and Jail Bar motorcycle handlebars in 10inch, 12inch, and 14inch heights. Please see the recall report for the full list of affected part numbers. The handlebars may be improperly welded, which can cause them to crack and separate from the motorcycle.

Remedy No remedy has been established at this time. The manufacturer has not yet provided a schedule for recall notification. Owners may contact Performance Machine customer service at 1-714-523-3000.

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Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

*****

NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V217000

Manufacturer Piaggio Group Americas, Inc.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary Piaggio Group Americas, Inc. (Piaggio) is recalling certain 2020-2021 MP3 500 HPE scooters. The brake hose terminal fittings zinc plating may contaminate the brake fluid, decreasing brake performance.

Remedy Dealers will perform a complete brake system flush, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed April 18, 2022. Owners may contact Piaggio customer service at 1-212-380-4400.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V207000

Manufacturer Triumph Motorcycles America, Ltd.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary Triumph Motorcycles America, Ltd. (Triumph) is recalling certain 2022 Speed Triple RS and Speed Triple RR motorcycles. The rear brake disc bolts may loosen.

Remedy Dealers will replace the rear brake disc bolts, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed April 29, 2022. Owners may contact Triumph customer service at 1-678-854-2010. Triumph’s number for this recall is SRAN 596.

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Manufacturer Arcimoto Inc

Components SERVICE BRAKES

Summary Arcimoto Inc (Arcimoto) is recalling certain 2020-2022 Deliverator, 2019-2022 FUV, 2021-2022 Rapid Responder, and 2020-2022 Roadster motorcycles. The brake pressure switch may corrode after exposure to salt and chemicals found in de-icers, causing the brake lights to illuminate constantly.

Remedy Owners will be notified by mail and instructed to contact Arcimoto to schedule a service appointment to have the brake pressure switch inspected and dielectric grease added to the connection to prevent the brake lights from remaining on. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed on May 2, 2022. Owners may contact Arcimoto customer service at 1-541-683-6293.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22E022000

Manufacturer Midwest Motorsports LLC

Components EQUIPMENT

Summary Midwest Motorsports LLC (Midwest) is recalling certain Kylin helmets, model number K77, in sizes L, XL and XXL. The helmets may not adequately protect the wearer in the event of a head impact during a crash. As such, these helmets fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 218, “Motorcycle Helmets.”

Remedy Midwest will notify the helmet purchasers and instruct them to return the helmets for a full refund. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed May 6, 2022. Owners may contact Midwest customer service at 1-616-935-7443.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

Your motorcycle helmet is your most important piece of equipment so keeping it clean is important.  Not just from an appearance perspective but as a method to ensure it is still in good working condition. Also, April is Motorcycle Helmet Awareness month so now is a good time to do the work!

While you are cleaning your helmet look for cracks in the shell, that the hard foam is intact and in good condition (this is the part that does most of the work to protect your head) and all the other parts are in good order.  

Before you start… read your owner’s manual on cleaning your specific motorcycle helmet.

1 – First thing is to clean the exterior of the motorcycle helmet. Using a wet microfiber cloth or a paper towel, lay it across the visor and helmet shell for at least 10 minutes. This will soften the baked-on bugs and cruds allowing them to be wiped away reducing the chance to scratch or damage the finish. You may have to repeat this step.

2 – Remove the visor after you have cleaned the exterior. Use warm soapy water to really get the visor clean inside and out. Rinse, dry and reassemble your helmet.

3 – The visor needs special attention. DO NOT use any products that have acid or ammonia!  Even products with citric acid can damage the visor.  Most glass cleaners have some form of acid or ammonia so pay close attention or just avoid them. Warm soapy water and microfiber cloth is the best way to safely clean your visor.

4 – Make sure you clean the visor mechanism.  Keeping the mechanism clean will ensure it works as designed.

5 – Does your helmet have a sun visor?  If it does clean it in the same manner, you cleaned the visor.  No ammonia or acid-based cleaners!

6 – Next up is the interior of your motorcycle helmet.  Most helmets allow you to remove the interior padding. Look at your owner’s manual for directions on removing the padding. Some manufactures allow you to use a washing machine and other recommend hand cleaning in warm soapy water.  If you use the hand method, I recommend using a baby shampoo.

7 – If your helmet’s padding is not removable follow the instructions your helmet manufacture provides. But, in my opinion, dunking the entire helmet into soapy water is not the way to go.  It takes forever to dry; it can mildew, and I am always unsure if it can damage the underlying foam.  My suggestion is to use a motorcycle helmet sanitizing spray.

8 – Check the air vents to make sure they are clean, and function as designed. A shot of compressed air, from the inside, might dislodge dried road grime and bugs.

9 – Put it back together, following the manufacturer’s instructions, if you still have them.


Ride on, Ride safe

There are a lot of things you can do with old motorcycle helmets. Make planters or art with them for example.

But one of the most important things you can do with those old motorcycle helmets is to donate them to emergency services. Why? Because they need to train to deal with motorcycle accidents and how to handle the helmets is one of the things they need to practice.

This month IJustWant2Ride.com and The Dawghouse Motorcycle Radio show donated 10 old helmets to the Front Royal Fire Department. With April being Motorcycle Helmet Safety Month, it was the right time to get rid of the old lids.

April is Motorcycle Helmet Safety month so now is a good time to make sure your lid is in good shape.  You should, at least once a year, check your helmet to make sure it is in good shape, as it is your primary safety tool. I just bought new helmets, read on to find out why.

What should you look at while checking your helmet? Here are 9 items you should look at when assessing your motorcycle helmet for use in another year:

1) Is the shell all in one piece?  Are there cracks or splits?

2) Are the straps and connectors in good shape, no adverse wear or tear?

3) Is the internal padding is connected and stays in place?

4) Remove the padding and check the foam.  Is it dented or has cracks?

5) While looking at the foam, most companies place a sticker printed with the “birthday” of your helmet.  Is it over 5 years old?

6) Does the rest of the internals look in good operating conditions?

7) Check the visor for damage that might obscure your vision, can you see clearly?

8) Are the screws or other visor attachments tight and is the visor working as expected?

9 Make sure that insects/creatures are not living in your helmet, see photo below!

Let’s talk about item 5, the 5-year rule.  Most manufactures recommend that you replace your helmet after 5 years. The sceptic in us will think “more sells = more money” for the motorcycle helmet makers. The reason, they state, is that the foam between the padding and shell will deteriorate over time reducing its ability to protect your skull.

I believe in the 5-year rule, but I also check every year.  I just replaced my 7-year-old Nolan motorcycle helmet this month.  Why? When I ran my hands over the foam it no longer felt as smooth as it once did. It is hard to describe but, I felt that the foam was starting to show its age and we needed new helmets.

It is your head; I hope these checks help you out.  


Ride on, Ride safe

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

*****

NHTSA Campaign Number: 22E009000

Manufacturer Fuel Helmets

Components EQUIPMENT

Summary: Fuel Helmets is recalling certain SH-WS001 motorcycle helmets, part number SH-WS0016, size Large. The helmet may not adequately protect the wearer in the event of a head impact during a crash. As such, these helmets fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 218, “Motorcycle Helmets.”

Remedy : Fuel Helmets will notify owners, and provide a credit to replace the helmet or reimburse the cost of the helmet. The manufacturer has not yet provided a schedule for recall notification. Owners may contact Fuel Helmets customer service at 1-855-355-3835.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V062000

Manufacturer Triumph Motorcycles America, Ltd.

Components STRUCTURE

Summary: Triumph Motorcycles America, Ltd. (Triumph) is recalling certain 2022 Trident motorcycles. The side stand may not support the weight of the motorcycle and bend, causing the motorcycle to become unstable while parked.

Remedy: Dealers will replace the side stand, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 24, 2022. Owners may contact Triumph customer service at 1-678-854-2010. Triumph’s number for this recall is SRAN 593.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22E006000

Manufacturer Nexxpro – Fabrica de Capacetes, S.A.

Components EQUIPMENT

Summary: Nexxpro-Fabrica de Capacetes, S.A. (Nexxpro) is recalling certain X.R2 motorcycle helmets, part number 01XR22312455100M, in size M. Due to a manufacturing error, the helmets may not adequately protect the wearer in the event of a head impact during a crash. As such, these helmets fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 218, “Motorcycle Helmets.”

Remedy: Nexxpro will notify owners and replace the helmets, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 15, 2022. Owners may contact Nexxpro customer service at 1-800-461-1226.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V061000

Manufacturer Honda (American Honda Motor Co.)

Components ENGINE AND ENGINE COOLING

Summary: Honda (American Honda Motor Co) is recalling certain 2021 CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP motorcycles. Under certain driving conditions, the exhaust pipe may overheat, which could melt the oil cooler pipe and cause it to rupture.

Remedy: Dealers will replace the oil cooler pipe and install a heat guard between the exhaust pipe and oil cooler pipe, free of charge. Letters notifying owners of the safety risk are expected to be mailed March 14, 2022. A second letter will be sent once the remedy is available. Owners are advised not to ride their motorcycle above 5,000 RPM in 1st gear until the recall repair is complete. Owners may contact Honda customer service at 1-866-784-1870. Honda’s number for this recall is KN3.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V030000

Manufacturer Harley-Davidson Motor Company

Components ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

Summary: Harley Davidson Motor Company (Harley-Davidson) is recalling certain 2021 Pan America 1250S (RA1250S), Pan America 1250 (RA1250), and Sportster S (RH1250S) motorcycles. The instrument cluster module may not display the speedometer and neutral indicator at start-up when the module is below freezing temperatures. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 123, “Motorcycle Controls and Displays.”

Remedy: Dealers will update the instrument cluster module software, free of charge. Owner notification letters were mailed February 8, 2022. Owners may contact Harley-Davidson customer service at 1-800-258-2464. Harley-Davidson’s number for this recall is 0631.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

*****

NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V023000

Manufacturer BMW of North America, LLC

Components SUSPENSION

Summary BMW of North America, LLC (BMW) is recalling certain 2019-2020 K1600 GT, K1600 GTL, and K1600 B motorcycles. The link strut connecting the rear suspension to the frame may have insufficient strength, which can cause the link strut to become damaged.

Remedy Dealers will replace the rear link strut, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 15, 2022. Owners may contact BMW customer service at 1-800-525-7417.

*****

NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V014000

Manufacturer KTM North America, Inc.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary KTM North America, Inc. (KTM) is recalling certain 2022 Husqvarna 350s and Husqvarna 501s motorcycles. The brake pad retaining clips on the front brake caliper may have been mounted incorrectly, which could result in loose or detached front brake pads.

Remedy Owners are advised to not ride their motorcycles until the repair has been performed. Dealers will replace the front and rear brake pad retaining clips, free of charge. Owners notification letters are expected to be mailed in January 2022. Owners may contact KTM customer service at 1-888-985-6090. KTM’s number for this recall is HTB2111. This recall supersedes NHTSA recall 21V-678. Motorcycles that were previously repaired under recall 21V-678 will need to have the new remedy performed under this recall.

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RIDE ON, RIDE SAFE

What has happened to Easyriders magazine?

In the lead up to Christmas 2021 when, at a local bookstore, I noticed the latest issue of Easyriders magazine.  But that magazine did not look at all correct, it did not have a hot bike and girl on the cover.

In fact, glancing through it at the newsstand, it did not have “really” have any hot bikes and no nude or scantly clothed women.

The new Easyriders magazine looked more like coffee table style magazine then anything else.  All this raised my curiosity to find out just what happed to the old school motorcycle magazine.

Death of Easyriders Magazine

The original Easyriders magazine was a champion of the counterculture, on the road biker symbolized in movies like “Easyrider”.  But, as we all know, the printed word is in decline due to the evolution of digital media.  From my point of view, magazines have been the hardest hit with many, to many, motorcycle magazines failing to survive the transition. 

Easyriders magazine started in the early 1970s and always showcased the best motorcycles from across America along with the aforementioned scantily clad women.  Later Easyriders would host and run events, rallies (or as they called them rodeos), and motorcycle shows.

From what I can gather, that Easyrider magazine closed its doors and auctioned off what was left in 2018.

So, What Happened Next?

It appears that a Canadian clothing company called StrongHold now owns the name and trademark of the old company.  If you go to the new Easyriders website you can purchase $16 shaving kits, $30 t-shirts, $25 boxers, and $60 hoodies.

The magazine, as noted above, is now more “up-scale” targeted to a very different audience then the original Easyriders. On their website they state that this is an “Elevation of an Iconic Brand”, that it is more then a magazine it is a lifestyle.

I purchased the second issue and I enjoyed it quite a bit.  Short stories and great pictures laid out in a modern format; the magazine looks nothing like the classic version.

Rodeos and events

Easyriders did support three events 2021 but the long running, over 30 years, rodeo in Chillicothe, OH will not be back in 2022 but not due to the pandemic.

The town, fairgrounds and county will not allow the Easyriders event to return because, during the 2021 event, there was, very nearly, a “gang” battle. 

According to reports an undercover cop stopped the unnamed biker gangs from starting a shootout when he spotted “his” gang putting guns together and getting ready to move against their rivals. The gangs were not identified.

Easyriders is dead, long live Easyriders.

I am sure many purest will not like the new Easyriders but, at least it is still around.  I don’t have any issue with the new direction while at the same time, I am kind of missing the old magazine. Things change and in this new age, at least we still have a motorcycle magazine on the news stand.

Ride On, Ride Safe

(If I did not get anything right, please let me know!)