Posts Tagged ‘motorcycle safety’

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V217000

Manufacturer Piaggio Group Americas, Inc.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary Piaggio Group Americas, Inc. (Piaggio) is recalling certain 2020-2021 MP3 500 HPE scooters. The brake hose terminal fittings zinc plating may contaminate the brake fluid, decreasing brake performance.

Remedy Dealers will perform a complete brake system flush, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed April 18, 2022. Owners may contact Piaggio customer service at 1-212-380-4400.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V207000

Manufacturer Triumph Motorcycles America, Ltd.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary Triumph Motorcycles America, Ltd. (Triumph) is recalling certain 2022 Speed Triple RS and Speed Triple RR motorcycles. The rear brake disc bolts may loosen.

Remedy Dealers will replace the rear brake disc bolts, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed April 29, 2022. Owners may contact Triumph customer service at 1-678-854-2010. Triumph’s number for this recall is SRAN 596.

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Manufacturer Arcimoto Inc

Components SERVICE BRAKES

Summary Arcimoto Inc (Arcimoto) is recalling certain 2020-2022 Deliverator, 2019-2022 FUV, 2021-2022 Rapid Responder, and 2020-2022 Roadster motorcycles. The brake pressure switch may corrode after exposure to salt and chemicals found in de-icers, causing the brake lights to illuminate constantly.

Remedy Owners will be notified by mail and instructed to contact Arcimoto to schedule a service appointment to have the brake pressure switch inspected and dielectric grease added to the connection to prevent the brake lights from remaining on. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed on May 2, 2022. Owners may contact Arcimoto customer service at 1-541-683-6293.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22E022000

Manufacturer Midwest Motorsports LLC

Components EQUIPMENT

Summary Midwest Motorsports LLC (Midwest) is recalling certain Kylin helmets, model number K77, in sizes L, XL and XXL. The helmets may not adequately protect the wearer in the event of a head impact during a crash. As such, these helmets fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 218, “Motorcycle Helmets.”

Remedy Midwest will notify the helmet purchasers and instruct them to return the helmets for a full refund. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed May 6, 2022. Owners may contact Midwest customer service at 1-616-935-7443.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

Your motorcycle helmet is your most important piece of equipment so keeping it clean is important.  Not just from an appearance perspective but as a method to ensure it is still in good working condition. Also, April is Motorcycle Helmet Awareness month so now is a good time to do the work!

While you are cleaning your helmet look for cracks in the shell, that the hard foam is intact and in good condition (this is the part that does most of the work to protect your head) and all the other parts are in good order.  

Before you start… read your owner’s manual on cleaning your specific motorcycle helmet.

1 – First thing is to clean the exterior of the motorcycle helmet. Using a wet microfiber cloth or a paper towel, lay it across the visor and helmet shell for at least 10 minutes. This will soften the baked-on bugs and cruds allowing them to be wiped away reducing the chance to scratch or damage the finish. You may have to repeat this step.

2 – Remove the visor after you have cleaned the exterior. Use warm soapy water to really get the visor clean inside and out. Rinse, dry and reassemble your helmet.

3 – The visor needs special attention. DO NOT use any products that have acid or ammonia!  Even products with citric acid can damage the visor.  Most glass cleaners have some form of acid or ammonia so pay close attention or just avoid them. Warm soapy water and microfiber cloth is the best way to safely clean your visor.

4 – Make sure you clean the visor mechanism.  Keeping the mechanism clean will ensure it works as designed.

5 – Does your helmet have a sun visor?  If it does clean it in the same manner, you cleaned the visor.  No ammonia or acid-based cleaners!

6 – Next up is the interior of your motorcycle helmet.  Most helmets allow you to remove the interior padding. Look at your owner’s manual for directions on removing the padding. Some manufactures allow you to use a washing machine and other recommend hand cleaning in warm soapy water.  If you use the hand method, I recommend using a baby shampoo.

7 – If your helmet’s padding is not removable follow the instructions your helmet manufacture provides. But, in my opinion, dunking the entire helmet into soapy water is not the way to go.  It takes forever to dry; it can mildew, and I am always unsure if it can damage the underlying foam.  My suggestion is to use a motorcycle helmet sanitizing spray.

8 – Check the air vents to make sure they are clean, and function as designed. A shot of compressed air, from the inside, might dislodge dried road grime and bugs.

9 – Put it back together, following the manufacturer’s instructions, if you still have them.


Ride on, Ride safe

There are a lot of things you can do with old motorcycle helmets. Make planters or art with them for example.

But one of the most important things you can do with those old motorcycle helmets is to donate them to emergency services. Why? Because they need to train to deal with motorcycle accidents and how to handle the helmets is one of the things they need to practice.

This month IJustWant2Ride.com and The Dawghouse Motorcycle Radio show donated 10 old helmets to the Front Royal Fire Department. With April being Motorcycle Helmet Safety Month, it was the right time to get rid of the old lids.

April is Motorcycle Helmet Safety month so now is a good time to make sure your lid is in good shape.  You should, at least once a year, check your helmet to make sure it is in good shape, as it is your primary safety tool. I just bought new helmets, read on to find out why.

What should you look at while checking your helmet? Here are 9 items you should look at when assessing your motorcycle helmet for use in another year:

1) Is the shell all in one piece?  Are there cracks or splits?

2) Are the straps and connectors in good shape, no adverse wear or tear?

3) Is the internal padding is connected and stays in place?

4) Remove the padding and check the foam.  Is it dented or has cracks?

5) While looking at the foam, most companies place a sticker printed with the “birthday” of your helmet.  Is it over 5 years old?

6) Does the rest of the internals look in good operating conditions?

7) Check the visor for damage that might obscure your vision, can you see clearly?

8) Are the screws or other visor attachments tight and is the visor working as expected?

9 Make sure that insects/creatures are not living in your helmet, see photo below!

Let’s talk about item 5, the 5-year rule.  Most manufactures recommend that you replace your helmet after 5 years. The sceptic in us will think “more sells = more money” for the motorcycle helmet makers. The reason, they state, is that the foam between the padding and shell will deteriorate over time reducing its ability to protect your skull.

I believe in the 5-year rule, but I also check every year.  I just replaced my 7-year-old Nolan motorcycle helmet this month.  Why? When I ran my hands over the foam it no longer felt as smooth as it once did. It is hard to describe but, I felt that the foam was starting to show its age and we needed new helmets.

It is your head; I hope these checks help you out.  


Ride on, Ride safe

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22E009000

Manufacturer Fuel Helmets

Components EQUIPMENT

Summary: Fuel Helmets is recalling certain SH-WS001 motorcycle helmets, part number SH-WS0016, size Large. The helmet may not adequately protect the wearer in the event of a head impact during a crash. As such, these helmets fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 218, “Motorcycle Helmets.”

Remedy : Fuel Helmets will notify owners, and provide a credit to replace the helmet or reimburse the cost of the helmet. The manufacturer has not yet provided a schedule for recall notification. Owners may contact Fuel Helmets customer service at 1-855-355-3835.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V062000

Manufacturer Triumph Motorcycles America, Ltd.

Components STRUCTURE

Summary: Triumph Motorcycles America, Ltd. (Triumph) is recalling certain 2022 Trident motorcycles. The side stand may not support the weight of the motorcycle and bend, causing the motorcycle to become unstable while parked.

Remedy: Dealers will replace the side stand, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 24, 2022. Owners may contact Triumph customer service at 1-678-854-2010. Triumph’s number for this recall is SRAN 593.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22E006000

Manufacturer Nexxpro – Fabrica de Capacetes, S.A.

Components EQUIPMENT

Summary: Nexxpro-Fabrica de Capacetes, S.A. (Nexxpro) is recalling certain X.R2 motorcycle helmets, part number 01XR22312455100M, in size M. Due to a manufacturing error, the helmets may not adequately protect the wearer in the event of a head impact during a crash. As such, these helmets fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 218, “Motorcycle Helmets.”

Remedy: Nexxpro will notify owners and replace the helmets, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 15, 2022. Owners may contact Nexxpro customer service at 1-800-461-1226.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V061000

Manufacturer Honda (American Honda Motor Co.)

Components ENGINE AND ENGINE COOLING

Summary: Honda (American Honda Motor Co) is recalling certain 2021 CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP motorcycles. Under certain driving conditions, the exhaust pipe may overheat, which could melt the oil cooler pipe and cause it to rupture.

Remedy: Dealers will replace the oil cooler pipe and install a heat guard between the exhaust pipe and oil cooler pipe, free of charge. Letters notifying owners of the safety risk are expected to be mailed March 14, 2022. A second letter will be sent once the remedy is available. Owners are advised not to ride their motorcycle above 5,000 RPM in 1st gear until the recall repair is complete. Owners may contact Honda customer service at 1-866-784-1870. Honda’s number for this recall is KN3.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V030000

Manufacturer Harley-Davidson Motor Company

Components ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

Summary: Harley Davidson Motor Company (Harley-Davidson) is recalling certain 2021 Pan America 1250S (RA1250S), Pan America 1250 (RA1250), and Sportster S (RH1250S) motorcycles. The instrument cluster module may not display the speedometer and neutral indicator at start-up when the module is below freezing temperatures. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 123, “Motorcycle Controls and Displays.”

Remedy: Dealers will update the instrument cluster module software, free of charge. Owner notification letters were mailed February 8, 2022. Owners may contact Harley-Davidson customer service at 1-800-258-2464. Harley-Davidson’s number for this recall is 0631.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

*****

NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V023000

Manufacturer BMW of North America, LLC

Components SUSPENSION

Summary BMW of North America, LLC (BMW) is recalling certain 2019-2020 K1600 GT, K1600 GTL, and K1600 B motorcycles. The link strut connecting the rear suspension to the frame may have insufficient strength, which can cause the link strut to become damaged.

Remedy Dealers will replace the rear link strut, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 15, 2022. Owners may contact BMW customer service at 1-800-525-7417.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 22V014000

Manufacturer KTM North America, Inc.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary KTM North America, Inc. (KTM) is recalling certain 2022 Husqvarna 350s and Husqvarna 501s motorcycles. The brake pad retaining clips on the front brake caliper may have been mounted incorrectly, which could result in loose or detached front brake pads.

Remedy Owners are advised to not ride their motorcycles until the repair has been performed. Dealers will replace the front and rear brake pad retaining clips, free of charge. Owners notification letters are expected to be mailed in January 2022. Owners may contact KTM customer service at 1-888-985-6090. KTM’s number for this recall is HTB2111. This recall supersedes NHTSA recall 21V-678. Motorcycles that were previously repaired under recall 21V-678 will need to have the new remedy performed under this recall.

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RIDE ON, RIDE SAFE

What has happened to Easyriders magazine?

In the lead up to Christmas 2021 when, at a local bookstore, I noticed the latest issue of Easyriders magazine.  But that magazine did not look at all correct, it did not have a hot bike and girl on the cover.

In fact, glancing through it at the newsstand, it did not have “really” have any hot bikes and no nude or scantly clothed women.

The new Easyriders magazine looked more like coffee table style magazine then anything else.  All this raised my curiosity to find out just what happed to the old school motorcycle magazine.

Death of Easyriders Magazine

The original Easyriders magazine was a champion of the counterculture, on the road biker symbolized in movies like “Easyrider”.  But, as we all know, the printed word is in decline due to the evolution of digital media.  From my point of view, magazines have been the hardest hit with many, to many, motorcycle magazines failing to survive the transition. 

Easyriders magazine started in the early 1970s and always showcased the best motorcycles from across America along with the aforementioned scantily clad women.  Later Easyriders would host and run events, rallies (or as they called them rodeos), and motorcycle shows.

From what I can gather, that Easyrider magazine closed its doors and auctioned off what was left in 2018.

So, What Happened Next?

It appears that a Canadian clothing company called StrongHold now owns the name and trademark of the old company.  If you go to the new Easyriders website you can purchase $16 shaving kits, $30 t-shirts, $25 boxers, and $60 hoodies.

The magazine, as noted above, is now more “up-scale” targeted to a very different audience then the original Easyriders. On their website they state that this is an “Elevation of an Iconic Brand”, that it is more then a magazine it is a lifestyle.

I purchased the second issue and I enjoyed it quite a bit.  Short stories and great pictures laid out in a modern format; the magazine looks nothing like the classic version.

Rodeos and events

Easyriders did support three events 2021 but the long running, over 30 years, rodeo in Chillicothe, OH will not be back in 2022 but not due to the pandemic.

The town, fairgrounds and county will not allow the Easyriders event to return because, during the 2021 event, there was, very nearly, a “gang” battle. 

According to reports an undercover cop stopped the unnamed biker gangs from starting a shootout when he spotted “his” gang putting guns together and getting ready to move against their rivals. The gangs were not identified.

Easyriders is dead, long live Easyriders.

I am sure many purest will not like the new Easyriders but, at least it is still around.  I don’t have any issue with the new direction while at the same time, I am kind of missing the old magazine. Things change and in this new age, at least we still have a motorcycle magazine on the news stand.

Ride On, Ride Safe

(If I did not get anything right, please let me know!)

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

*****

NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V987000

Manufacturer Honda (American Honda Motor Co.)

Components ENGINE AND ENGINE COOLING

Summary: Honda (American Honda Motor Co.) is recalling certain 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 (CMX1100) motorcycles. The radiator cap may have been improperly formed during manufacturing, which could create an insufficient seal.

Remedy: Dealers will replace the radiator cap and refill any lost coolant, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 13, 2022. Owners may contact Honda service at 1-888-234-2138. Honda’s number for this recall is KN1.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V940000

Manufacturer Zero Motorcycles Inc.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary: Zero Motorcycles, Inc. (Zero) is recalling certain 2022 SR, SR/F, and SR/S motorcycles. The incorrect rear brake pads were installed. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 122, “Motorcycle Brake System.”

Remedy: Dealers will inspect and replace the rear brake pads, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed December 20, 2021. Owners may contact Zero customer service at 1-888-841-8085. Zero’s number for this recall SV-ZMC-022-018.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V865000

Manufacturer Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA

Components ENGINE AND ENGINE COOLING

Summary: Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA (Yamaha) is recalling certain 2016-2021 FJR13 motorcycles. The Engine Control Unit (ECU) programming installed under Recall 20V-813 (990141), that was designed to prevent gear damage, may prevent the engine from accelerating as intended.

Remedy: Owners are advised not to ride their motorcycles until they are repaired. Dealers will reprogram the ECU, free of charge. Motorcycles that were previously repaired under recall 20V-813 will need to return for the new remedy. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed December 9, 2021. Owners may contact Yamaha customer service at 1-800-962-7926. Yamaha’s number for this recall is 990152.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

Why 9 tips on winter motorcycle storage? Because everyone has lists of 10 and 11 is to hard! Hah!

The first heavy frosts have already stuck in the northern Virginia area of the United States.  While I am sure there more than a few good riding days left …. Those days are going to be leaving us soon.  It is important to make sure your motorcycle is well taken care of in the winter so it will be ready to roll in the spring!

Riding season, depending on what you are willing to put up with, is either over or nearly so. There are thousands of suggestions and tips out there on winterizing your motorcycle, such as putting a teaspoon of oil in your cylinders and filling the tires with nitrogen, so do your own research to find out what works for you with manner and place you store your bike. If it is time for you to store your bike until the spring thaw here are some of the things you should consider.

1. Stabilize the fuel or drain the tank. Almost all gas, especially the ethanol “enhanced” stuff, has a short shelf life. While many believe that draining the tank (and carb system if equipped) is all that is needed to prevent the gasoline from turning to muck, I am not one of them. I just don’t think it is possible to burn all the fuel in the system, small despots will always remain. I prefer to fill the tank and add fuel stabilizer, I then run the engine for at least 15 minutes to work the stabilized fuel through the entire fuel system. After the short ride to get the stabilizer through the system I then refill the tank as much as possible to limit the amount of air in the tank.

2. Change your oil.   Do this as close to your final days of riding as reasonably possible. If you are a do-it-yourself guy consider doing the oil change right after you complete the ride to mix in the fuel stabilizer. Why change the oil before storage? Because changing the oil now removes the sludge, dirt and residual contaminants in the oil that could oxidize during storage. Make sure to run the engine a few minutes to disburse the new oil throughout the engine.

3. Prepare and Protect the Battery. Most motorcycle batteries are lead-acid and should be kept under a constant charge in order to maintain their life. Be aware there is a difference between a battery tender and a tickle charger. A battery tender is specialized charger that has special circuits to prevent overcharging your battery. You can use a trickle charger but check the instructions carefully; many cannot be used on your battery for more than 30 minutes each day. If your motorcycle will be stored where freezing temperatures will likely occur often, consider removing the battery and place it in a warm dry place. You will still need to keep it charged but he cold will have less effect on the life of the battery.

4. Check your anti-freeze. Harley Davidson riders this now includes a lot of you too. Make sure you have the proper amount and type of anti-freeze in your bike. Depending on what type of coolant your manufacture uses it could be one of several colors. Rules of thumb, if it a light color or clear you need to change the fluid. If you are a do-it-yourself kind of person remember to “bleed” the system to get all the air out. If would be a bad thing if on your first spring ride your bike overheats.

5. Clean your bike. Whether you kept your bike clean all riding season or you only give it a bath once a year now is the time to do it (again). All that evil road krap (dirt/sand/salt/oils/road kill) attaches to your motorcycle’s metal surfaces and will begin to corrode those parts. A good cleaning before storage will make that much harder for the forces of evil to work their powers on your bike. If you bike uses a chain, now is the time to clean it as well.

6. Wax, polish and Lubricate. After the good cleaning I think it is important to put a nice coat of polish on the paint and chrome. This will help protect the surfaces from any condensation that might occur during storageLubricate the chain as described in your owner’s manual. Lube all moving parts such as cables and your side stand pivot. Use a metal protectant spray on the underside of the frame and drivetrain, I prefer to spray it on a rag and wipe it on that way I can also get some of the dirt I missed while cleaning the bike. These actions will help you combat rust on any areas exposed from pitting or scratches.

7. Put a sock in it. When I was a kid I was helping a friend start his bike in the spring and shortly after starting we heard a lot of rattling in the exhaust. A few moment later out shot a handful of lightly roosted acorns that some chipmunk had hidden there. Depending on the area you are storing the bike cover your exhausts or insert exhaust plugs to protect yourself from critters.

8. Check your Tires. Make sure your tires are properly inflated. Now I am not sure about this step but, many folks recommend that you let some of the air out of the tires, to allow any condensation to escape. Of course you need to add more air to the tires after you bleed them. Also many folks think you need to get the tires off the ground if you are going to be letting them sit for long periods to avoid “flat spots”. I am not sure I concur with this thinking and I have read in several places that Harley Davidson does not recommend this as it places stress on the front suspension. Check with your manufacture if this is something you are not sure about.

winter tires

9. Cover your motorcycle. Even when stored inside, your bike should be covered while stored. Use a cover that can breathe don’t use a plastic tarp. Moisture should not be allowed to become trapped under the cover on your bike’s metal surfaces.

That’s the bare basics to storing your bike. Remember winter is also a good time to take care of those bike projects you have been thinking about… for me it will be installing a removable tour pack.


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Ride on, Ride safe

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

*****

NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V819000

Manufacturer Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A.

Components ENGINE AND ENGINE COOLING

Summary Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A. (KMC) is recalling certain 2020 W800 CAFE (EJ800C), and 2020-2021 W800 (EJ800D) motorcycles. The exhaust pipe nuts may not be tightened properly, possibly resulting in the exhaust pipe nuts and collar falling off the motorcycle.

Remedy Dealers will replace the gaskets and the collars, and reinstall the muffler, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed November 3, 2021. Owners may contact KMC customer service at 1-866-802-9381. KMC’s number for this recall is MC21-07.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V806000

Manufacturer Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA

Components ENGINE

Summary Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA (Yamaha) is recalling certain 2020-2021 XVS95C motorcycles. The engine case may leak oil onto the rear tire.

Remedy Owners are advised to not ride their motorcycles until they are repaired. Dealers will inspect and replace the engine, as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed October 29, 2021. Owners may contact Yamaha customer service at 1-800-962-7926. Yamaha’s number for this recall is 990150.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V804000

Manufacturer Honda (American Honda Motor Co.)

Components POWER TRAIN

SummaryHonda (American Honda Motor Co.) is recalling certain 2021 Trail 125 (CT125A) motorcycles. The gearshift pedal arm weld may fail, possibly resulting in the pedal breaking off the motorcycle.

RemedyDealers will replace the gearshift pedal assembly, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed November 15, 2021. Owners may contact Honda Powersports customer service at 1-866-784-1870. Honda’s number for this recall is KM8.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V795000

Manufacturer Zero Motorcycles Inc.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary Zero Motorcycles Inc. (Zero) is recalling certain 2020 SR/F motorcycles. The rear rotor bolts were insufficiently tightened.

Remedy Dealers will correctly tighten and replace the rear rotor bolts as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed October 25, 2021. Owners may contact Zero customer service at 1-888-841-8085. Zero’s number for this recall is SV-ZMC-020-417.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V792000

Manufacturer KTM North America, Inc.

Components POWER TRAIN

Summary KTM North America, Inc. (KTM) is recalling certain 2018-2020 690 Enduro R, Vitpilen 701, 701 Enduro, 701 Supermoto, 2019-2020 690 SMC R, Svartpilen, 2018-2019 690 Duke, and 2020 701 Enduro LR motorcycles. The bellow-style gasket on the clutch slave cylinder may have been damaged during manufacturing, which could cause the clutch to become inoperable and not disengage when the clutch lever is pulled in.

Remedy Dealers will inspect the clutch slave cylinder and replace it if necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed December 3, 2021. Owners may contact KTM customer service at 1-888-985-6090. KTM’s numbers for this recall are KTB2112 and HTB2110.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

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