Archive for the ‘Motorcycle’ Category

ijustwant2ride.com

This is my take on motorcycle news that grabbed my attention. There is a whole lot more out there, but this is the news that I want to discuss. Drop me a note if you disagree with my take.

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Up Shift – Royal Enfield’s Tour of the South Pole – A month or so ago I mentioned that Royal Enfield was going to ride to motorcycles to the South Pole.  On December 16, 2021, Santhosh Vijay Kumar and Dean Coxson reached the South Pole on board their Royal Enfield Himalayan.  It took them 15 days, a bit longer then expected due to a blizzard that forced a detour.

My Take – No world records involved just the bragging rights that the Himalayan motorcycle can take you on any adventure.  Congrats to the riders and Royal Enfield!  Oh and yes, it is summer at the South Pole, with temps getting to a balmy -22F.   

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Hitting Neutral – Motorcycles with Speed Limiters – Are motorcycles to fast? Whether or not you agree some motorcycle manufacturers are going to limit the top speed of their bikes. Those top end motorcycles, or superbikes, are going to be limited to 300KPH or 186MPH.

This is an attempt to appease politicians and safety activists ahead of any legal action taken by those politicians at the behest of the safety activists. So, the next batch of superbikes will be slower than the current models. Not sure that has ever happened before.

My Take – Is 200MPH to fast on a motorcycle, other then on a track?  Well yes, of course it is.  But, I do not like that we have to be forced to do something in the hopes that the politicians and activists will be appeased because they will NEVER BE APPEASED.

I have said it often in this blog, the end goal of safety activists, like the Vision Zero zealots, is to end motorcycling completely.

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Ride on, Ride Safe

Last year I had a hard time deciding what would make the “Best of” Motorcycle Memes for 2020… not so much this year.

I started out with 19 and these 9 memes came to the top for the Best of 2021 pretty quick.

My favorite this is the Ducati one at the top. May or may not be true….but funny!!!

Covid is once again impacting the artistic (or crazy) side of motorcycling.  The number of new, cool or just fabulous examples of motorcycle tank art was limited for 2021.

By limited I mean… I did not see a lot of good tank art.  Instead of the 9 best we have the 7 best motorcycle tanks for 2021. Where I know the artist I include the information, but the internet is not good about attribution.

Sigh

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Ride On, Ride Safe

What has happened to Easyriders magazine?

In the lead up to Christmas 2021 when, at a local bookstore, I noticed the latest issue of Easyriders magazine.  But that magazine did not look at all correct, it did not have a hot bike and girl on the cover.

In fact, glancing through it at the newsstand, it did not have “really” have any hot bikes and no nude or scantly clothed women.

The new Easyriders magazine looked more like coffee table style magazine then anything else.  All this raised my curiosity to find out just what happed to the old school motorcycle magazine.

Death of Easyriders Magazine

The original Easyriders magazine was a champion of the counterculture, on the road biker symbolized in movies like “Easyrider”.  But, as we all know, the printed word is in decline due to the evolution of digital media.  From my point of view, magazines have been the hardest hit with many, to many, motorcycle magazines failing to survive the transition. 

Easyriders magazine started in the early 1970s and always showcased the best motorcycles from across America along with the aforementioned scantily clad women.  Later Easyriders would host and run events, rallies (or as they called them rodeos), and motorcycle shows.

From what I can gather, that Easyrider magazine closed its doors and auctioned off what was left in 2018.

So, What Happened Next?

It appears that a Canadian clothing company called StrongHold now owns the name and trademark of the old company.  If you go to the new Easyriders website you can purchase $16 shaving kits, $30 t-shirts, $25 boxers, and $60 hoodies.

The magazine, as noted above, is now more “up-scale” targeted to a very different audience then the original Easyriders. On their website they state that this is an “Elevation of an Iconic Brand”, that it is more then a magazine it is a lifestyle.

I purchased the second issue and I enjoyed it quite a bit.  Short stories and great pictures laid out in a modern format; the magazine looks nothing like the classic version.

Rodeos and events

Easyriders did support three events 2021 but the long running, over 30 years, rodeo in Chillicothe, OH will not be back in 2022 but not due to the pandemic.

The town, fairgrounds and county will not allow the Easyriders event to return because, during the 2021 event, there was, very nearly, a “gang” battle. 

According to reports an undercover cop stopped the unnamed biker gangs from starting a shootout when he spotted “his” gang putting guns together and getting ready to move against their rivals. The gangs were not identified.

Easyriders is dead, long live Easyriders.

I am sure many purest will not like the new Easyriders but, at least it is still around.  I don’t have any issue with the new direction while at the same time, I am kind of missing the old magazine. Things change and in this new age, at least we still have a motorcycle magazine on the news stand.

Ride On, Ride Safe

(If I did not get anything right, please let me know!)

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V987000

Manufacturer Honda (American Honda Motor Co.)

Components ENGINE AND ENGINE COOLING

Summary: Honda (American Honda Motor Co.) is recalling certain 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 (CMX1100) motorcycles. The radiator cap may have been improperly formed during manufacturing, which could create an insufficient seal.

Remedy: Dealers will replace the radiator cap and refill any lost coolant, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 13, 2022. Owners may contact Honda service at 1-888-234-2138. Honda’s number for this recall is KN1.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V940000

Manufacturer Zero Motorcycles Inc.

Components SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC

Summary: Zero Motorcycles, Inc. (Zero) is recalling certain 2022 SR, SR/F, and SR/S motorcycles. The incorrect rear brake pads were installed. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 122, “Motorcycle Brake System.”

Remedy: Dealers will inspect and replace the rear brake pads, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed December 20, 2021. Owners may contact Zero customer service at 1-888-841-8085. Zero’s number for this recall SV-ZMC-022-018.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V865000

Manufacturer Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA

Components ENGINE AND ENGINE COOLING

Summary: Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA (Yamaha) is recalling certain 2016-2021 FJR13 motorcycles. The Engine Control Unit (ECU) programming installed under Recall 20V-813 (990141), that was designed to prevent gear damage, may prevent the engine from accelerating as intended.

Remedy: Owners are advised not to ride their motorcycles until they are repaired. Dealers will reprogram the ECU, free of charge. Motorcycles that were previously repaired under recall 20V-813 will need to return for the new remedy. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed December 9, 2021. Owners may contact Yamaha customer service at 1-800-962-7926. Yamaha’s number for this recall is 990152.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

ijustwant2ride.com

This is my take on motorcycle news that grabbed my attention. There is a whole lot more out there, but this is the news that I want to discuss. Drop me a note if you disagree with my take.

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Down Shift Apple recommends not mounting their phones to the motorcycle! – Even though one of the latest iPhone commercials show their phone mounted to a scooter, Apple says that is a no no. Apparently the image stabilization technology of the phone can be degraded or destroyed by the vibrations of the motorcycle. There report state “motorcycle engines generate intense high-amplitude vibrations, which are transmitted through the chassis and handlebars. It is not recommended to attach your iPhone to motorcycles with high-power or high-volume engines due to the amplitude of the vibration in certain frequency ranges that they generate.”

My Take – WOW, no word on if this violates the iPhone warranty or not. But, after years of seeing how Apple works, I bet the next phone will have a clause about how mounting to a motorcycle will violate the warranty. In the meantime, if you us the iPhone mounted to your bike, look for some form of vibration reduction mounting systems.   

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Up Shift Triumph reaches 1,000,000 – A milestone to say the least. This number is only counting the motorcycles that Triumph has produced since its “re-launch” over 30 years ago. The one millionth bike is a Tiger 900 with a special paint and appearance package.

My Take – I am of two thoughts on this 1) That is an average of only 32,000 motorcycles a year how have they survived with that small of an annual number … what is the mark-up on Triumph motorcycles? 2) Getting to that number of bikes through all the ups and downs our economies have experienced is a testament to good management and good motorcycles.

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Ride on, Ride Safe

Be aware that this motorcycle recall list is for the United States for the last 30 days, there is no way I could cover the entire world. But in the world of global manufacturing, if a motorcycle is being recalled in one country there is a good chance it is under recall in others.

Also, this should not be considered a definitive list, check for yourself if you have any questions.

If you are US based use the NHTSA website http://www.safercar.gov. Enter your VIN number to see if your motorcycle is affected by the recall.

If you are based outside the USA, use the appropriate website to locate recalls that may impact you.

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NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V901000

Manufacturer Honda (American Honda Motor Co.)

Components FUEL SYSTEM, GASOLINE

Summary Honda (American Honda Motor Co.) is recalling certain 2021 NC750XD motorcycles equipped with 6-speed dual clutch automatic transmissions. The fuel injection control module software may be programmed incorrectly, which can result in insufficient fuel when stopping, or accelerating from a stop.

Remedy Dealers will reprogram the fuel injection and dual clutch transmission software, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed January 7, 2022. Owners may contact Honda Powersports customer service at 866-784-1870. Honda’s number for this recall is KN0.

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 NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V836000

Manufacturer Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA

Components EQUIPMENT

Summary Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA (Yamaha) is recalling certain 2021 Tracer 900 GT (MTT9GTM) motorcycles. The Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) printed on the Federal Certification label may not match the VIN stamped on the vehicle. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of 49 CFR Part 567, “Certification.”

Remedy Yamaha will notify owners, and dealers will install a correct certification label, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed November 5, 2021. Owners may contact Yamaha customer service at 1-800-962-7926. Yamaha’s number for this recall is 990151.

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Ride On, Ride Safe

ijustwant2ride.com

This is my take on motorcycle news that grabbed my attention. There is a whole lot more out there but this is the news that I want to discuss. Drop me a note if you disagree with my take.

*****

Up Shift Royal Enfield at the South Pole – How do you celebrate 120 years making motorcycles? You take a ride to the South Pole! Starting November 26th Royal Enfield is taking two modified Himalayans on a 39-day, 480-mile adventure to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.

The motorcycles, ridden by Royal Enfield worker Santhosh Vijay and Dean Coxson, will ride in the tracks of the support vehicles. The bikes have been tested in Iceland to make sure they are capable for this tour of the real down under.

My Take – This is pretty cool (LOL get it)!  Some purest have poo-pooed the fact that they are riding in the competed tracks of the support vehicles, but I don’t have a problem with that. I guess that they are riding to the pole in the summer is an issue as well.  No, Royal Enfield is stepping up their game.

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Up ShiftDucati has record sales – Ducati is claiming that 1 in 4 superbikes sold is a Ducati Panigale. Not only that but they passed last year’s sales in the first 9 months of 2021. 2021 has been their best year ever with 49,693 motorcycles sold before the fourth quarter even began. The Multistrada was the best seller followed by the Scrambler 800, Streetfighter V4 and then the Monster.

My Take – 4,475 of that record setting number were sold in the US so we are doing our part! Congratulations to not only Ducati but to the industry!  Maybe, just maybe we are on the upswing of a new peak in motorcycling.

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Ride on, Ride Safe

It is that time of year again. Time to think about holiday gifts for your beloved motorcyclist (or crazy biker). This year I looked at what I would want for ME! Lucky for me they are quite applicable for any biker, rider!

9. Clear lens glasses – When it starts to get dark sunglasses are not the best thing to be wearing, been there, did that, did not like it. Having a second set of clear lens glasses or transition glasses will help your motorcyclist a lot.

8. Heated gear – We all “Just Want 2 Ride” right. The gift of heated gear will extend the riding season weeks or months depending on where you live.

7. Bike manual – The shop manual for your motorcyclist’s specific make and model. He or she may never use it for doing the hard work but knowing what is needed is always helpful before taking the motorcycle into the shop.

6. Lip balm/Suntan Lotion – Now how long has that stick of lip balm been in your biker’s pocket or saddlebag? If anything like what is in my bags…..2 to 4 years old, LOL Get them a replacement.

5. Handlebar Cell Phone Holder – There are a LOT of different types of phone holders out there. Some work better with certain phones so make sure you know what your motorcycle rider uses before buying the handlebar holder.

4. Frame them – Frame a nice picture of them with their motorcycle.  Simple and cheap but you might have to snoop on their phone to find the best one! 

3.  Helmet – Is your biker’s helmet more than 5 years old? If so, ask some sneaky questions to find out what they like in a helmet.  Full face, modular, open face, there are so many possibilities… maybe a gift certificate for a helmet might be better.

2. Custom Dynamic Motorcycle Lights – Custom Dynamic makes SUPER bright, eye catching lighting for motorcycles.  I have several sets on my bike and wish I had more! Look at the ProBeam LED Motorcycle Turn Signals.  These turn signal lights are really DIY

If I could get a commission on every purchase of Custom Dynamic lights I have influenced, I would never have to pay for this website again.

1 – Membership in the AMA – That is the American Motorcycle Association not he medical association (or the version of the AMA in your area).   Membership not only gets you things like emergency towing it gets you a voice in Washington DC.  The AMA is the biggest (but not the only) motorcycle lobbyist group trying to protect your right to ride.  This is, most likely the most important motorcycle gift idea on the list!

           American Motorcycle Association


Ride on, Ride safe

Why 9 tips on winter motorcycle storage? Because everyone has lists of 10 and 11 is to hard! Hah!

The first heavy frosts have already stuck in the northern Virginia area of the United States.  While I am sure there more than a few good riding days left …. Those days are going to be leaving us soon.  It is important to make sure your motorcycle is well taken care of in the winter so it will be ready to roll in the spring!

Riding season, depending on what you are willing to put up with, is either over or nearly so. There are thousands of suggestions and tips out there on winterizing your motorcycle, such as putting a teaspoon of oil in your cylinders and filling the tires with nitrogen, so do your own research to find out what works for you with manner and place you store your bike. If it is time for you to store your bike until the spring thaw here are some of the things you should consider.

1. Stabilize the fuel or drain the tank. Almost all gas, especially the ethanol “enhanced” stuff, has a short shelf life. While many believe that draining the tank (and carb system if equipped) is all that is needed to prevent the gasoline from turning to muck, I am not one of them. I just don’t think it is possible to burn all the fuel in the system, small despots will always remain. I prefer to fill the tank and add fuel stabilizer, I then run the engine for at least 15 minutes to work the stabilized fuel through the entire fuel system. After the short ride to get the stabilizer through the system I then refill the tank as much as possible to limit the amount of air in the tank.

2. Change your oil.   Do this as close to your final days of riding as reasonably possible. If you are a do-it-yourself guy consider doing the oil change right after you complete the ride to mix in the fuel stabilizer. Why change the oil before storage? Because changing the oil now removes the sludge, dirt and residual contaminants in the oil that could oxidize during storage. Make sure to run the engine a few minutes to disburse the new oil throughout the engine.

3. Prepare and Protect the Battery. Most motorcycle batteries are lead-acid and should be kept under a constant charge in order to maintain their life. Be aware there is a difference between a battery tender and a tickle charger. A battery tender is specialized charger that has special circuits to prevent overcharging your battery. You can use a trickle charger but check the instructions carefully; many cannot be used on your battery for more than 30 minutes each day. If your motorcycle will be stored where freezing temperatures will likely occur often, consider removing the battery and place it in a warm dry place. You will still need to keep it charged but he cold will have less effect on the life of the battery.

4. Check your anti-freeze. Harley Davidson riders this now includes a lot of you too. Make sure you have the proper amount and type of anti-freeze in your bike. Depending on what type of coolant your manufacture uses it could be one of several colors. Rules of thumb, if it a light color or clear you need to change the fluid. If you are a do-it-yourself kind of person remember to “bleed” the system to get all the air out. If would be a bad thing if on your first spring ride your bike overheats.

5. Clean your bike. Whether you kept your bike clean all riding season or you only give it a bath once a year now is the time to do it (again). All that evil road krap (dirt/sand/salt/oils/road kill) attaches to your motorcycle’s metal surfaces and will begin to corrode those parts. A good cleaning before storage will make that much harder for the forces of evil to work their powers on your bike. If you bike uses a chain, now is the time to clean it as well.

6. Wax, polish and Lubricate. After the good cleaning I think it is important to put a nice coat of polish on the paint and chrome. This will help protect the surfaces from any condensation that might occur during storageLubricate the chain as described in your owner’s manual. Lube all moving parts such as cables and your side stand pivot. Use a metal protectant spray on the underside of the frame and drivetrain, I prefer to spray it on a rag and wipe it on that way I can also get some of the dirt I missed while cleaning the bike. These actions will help you combat rust on any areas exposed from pitting or scratches.

7. Put a sock in it. When I was a kid I was helping a friend start his bike in the spring and shortly after starting we heard a lot of rattling in the exhaust. A few moment later out shot a handful of lightly roosted acorns that some chipmunk had hidden there. Depending on the area you are storing the bike cover your exhausts or insert exhaust plugs to protect yourself from critters.

8. Check your Tires. Make sure your tires are properly inflated. Now I am not sure about this step but, many folks recommend that you let some of the air out of the tires, to allow any condensation to escape. Of course you need to add more air to the tires after you bleed them. Also many folks think you need to get the tires off the ground if you are going to be letting them sit for long periods to avoid “flat spots”. I am not sure I concur with this thinking and I have read in several places that Harley Davidson does not recommend this as it places stress on the front suspension. Check with your manufacture if this is something you are not sure about.

winter tires

9. Cover your motorcycle. Even when stored inside, your bike should be covered while stored. Use a cover that can breathe don’t use a plastic tarp. Moisture should not be allowed to become trapped under the cover on your bike’s metal surfaces.

That’s the bare basics to storing your bike. Remember winter is also a good time to take care of those bike projects you have been thinking about… for me it will be installing a removable tour pack.


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Ride on, Ride safe